College students with learning disabilities: Perceptions of academic success

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284222
Title:
College students with learning disabilities: Perceptions of academic success
Author:
Ingersoll, Deborah Jeanne Hodge
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Semi-structured interviews provided the primary source of data in this qualitative study that was designed to determine factors that determine academic success and failure of college students with learning disabilities. All student participants were using either of two support programs for learning disability support services on a large Research I Land Grant University. Students were matched on cumulative high school grade point average (3.0 or higher), full-scale scores intelligence measures, and composite college entrance examinations scores. Students were further grouped as Successful (cumulative college grade point average of 3.0 or higher) or Jeopardy (cumulative college grade point average of less than 2.0). Participating instructors and learning disability support services personnel were identified by students during the interview process as examples of effective instructors/practitioners. Perceptions of students, instructors, and learning disabilities support staff were gathered and examined regarding the nature of students, teaching, environmental factors that facilitate and inhibit learning, and support services of the two programs providing support services for these college students with learning disabilities. Elements of self-efficacious attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of students were also examined. Data was analyzed to determine differences and commonalties between successful and unsuccessful students with learning disabilities. Concepts from social construction theory were used to identify the social context. Retention theory, self-efficacy theory, and literature from the fields of good practice and learning communities were also instrumental in the approach to data analysis. Suggestions for further research and implications for practice are offered while acknowledging the limitations of this study.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Special.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Woodard, Dudley W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCollege students with learning disabilities: Perceptions of academic successen_US
dc.creatorIngersoll, Deborah Jeanne Hodgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorIngersoll, Deborah Jeanne Hodgeen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSemi-structured interviews provided the primary source of data in this qualitative study that was designed to determine factors that determine academic success and failure of college students with learning disabilities. All student participants were using either of two support programs for learning disability support services on a large Research I Land Grant University. Students were matched on cumulative high school grade point average (3.0 or higher), full-scale scores intelligence measures, and composite college entrance examinations scores. Students were further grouped as Successful (cumulative college grade point average of 3.0 or higher) or Jeopardy (cumulative college grade point average of less than 2.0). Participating instructors and learning disability support services personnel were identified by students during the interview process as examples of effective instructors/practitioners. Perceptions of students, instructors, and learning disabilities support staff were gathered and examined regarding the nature of students, teaching, environmental factors that facilitate and inhibit learning, and support services of the two programs providing support services for these college students with learning disabilities. Elements of self-efficacious attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of students were also examined. Data was analyzed to determine differences and commonalties between successful and unsuccessful students with learning disabilities. Concepts from social construction theory were used to identify the social context. Retention theory, self-efficacy theory, and literature from the fields of good practice and learning communities were also instrumental in the approach to data analysis. Suggestions for further research and implications for practice are offered while acknowledging the limitations of this study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodard, Dudley W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983919en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40834360en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.