Arbuscular mycorrhiza: A linkage of plant, soil and surface hydrologic processes in a southwest grassland

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284211
Title:
Arbuscular mycorrhiza: A linkage of plant, soil and surface hydrologic processes in a southwest grassland
Author:
ODea, Mary Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A three-year randomized field study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of prescribed burning and the intense rainfall events associated with the summer monsoon of southern Arizona, specifically examining the interchange between the plant, soil and surface hydrologic processes within a savanna. The effects of fire and rainfall treatments were evaluated by examining their specific effects on vegetation, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), soil structure, soil nutrient capital, surface runoff and sediment. In addition to the field study, two factorial greenhouse studies were completed in conjunction with the field study. The objectives of the greenhouse studies were: (1) to test the effects of prescribed fire and high intensity rainfall on AMF infectivity potential, and (2) to examine the effect of mycotrophy on the biomass production of native and introduced grasses grown in pasteurized and native soils. A third study examined the development of an empirical model to estimate sediment production from the field study's plots. The objectives of this third study were: (1) to develop the empirical model using two years of collected sediment, and (2) to compare model estimates with the commonly used Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model. The results of these studies indicate that a integrated mechanism exists between the plant community and biotic and physical soil processes, which when disturbed affect the hydrology of the watershed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Physical Geography.; Hydrology.; Agriculture, Soil Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Guertin, D. Phillip; Reid, C. P. Patrick

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleArbuscular mycorrhiza: A linkage of plant, soil and surface hydrologic processes in a southwest grasslanden_US
dc.creatorODea, Mary Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorODea, Mary Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA three-year randomized field study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of prescribed burning and the intense rainfall events associated with the summer monsoon of southern Arizona, specifically examining the interchange between the plant, soil and surface hydrologic processes within a savanna. The effects of fire and rainfall treatments were evaluated by examining their specific effects on vegetation, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), soil structure, soil nutrient capital, surface runoff and sediment. In addition to the field study, two factorial greenhouse studies were completed in conjunction with the field study. The objectives of the greenhouse studies were: (1) to test the effects of prescribed fire and high intensity rainfall on AMF infectivity potential, and (2) to examine the effect of mycotrophy on the biomass production of native and introduced grasses grown in pasteurized and native soils. A third study examined the development of an empirical model to estimate sediment production from the field study's plots. The objectives of this third study were: (1) to develop the empirical model using two years of collected sediment, and (2) to compare model estimates with the commonly used Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model. The results of these studies indicate that a integrated mechanism exists between the plant community and biotic and physical soil processes, which when disturbed affect the hydrology of the watershed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectPhysical Geography.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Soil Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGuertin, D. Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReid, C. P. Patricken_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983897en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40825607en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.