Factors related to the desistance of crime in a longitudinal sample

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284203
Title:
Factors related to the desistance of crime in a longitudinal sample
Author:
Stuewig, Jeffrey
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examines characteristics of those who desist from compared to those who persist in delinquency over a two year span. Stability of antisocial behavior is a well accepted finding in the social sciences. In addition, many other individual characteristics associated with crime, such as impulsivity, are considered to be stable. These individual characteristics also show a relationship to long term negative outcomes of adult criminality and poor work history. Other variables that correlate with adolescent delinquency are parental monitoring, peer deviancy, and school attachment. While there is stability in antisocial behavior, there is also change; many individuals desist from delinquency as they age. Participants in this study were adolescents involved in a longitudinal study (N = 278). Results show a high degree of stability in delinquency as well as in other correlates of delinquency. Parental monitoring, peer deviancy, and school attachment are all related to delinquency, yet when the subjects are divided into persisters (n = 73) versus desisters (n = 35), these same variables are not significantly related to desistance. This suggests that the variables related to onset may be different from those related to desistance from delinquency. Nonetheless, if one takes a more dynamic perspective of this relationship, change can be seen. Change in impulsivity, risk taking, temper, peer substance use, and school attachment relates to a deceleration in delinquent activity. Results are discussed from a developmental perspective.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Developmental.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCloskey, Laura A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFactors related to the desistance of crime in a longitudinal sampleen_US
dc.creatorStuewig, Jeffreyen_US
dc.contributor.authorStuewig, Jeffreyen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines characteristics of those who desist from compared to those who persist in delinquency over a two year span. Stability of antisocial behavior is a well accepted finding in the social sciences. In addition, many other individual characteristics associated with crime, such as impulsivity, are considered to be stable. These individual characteristics also show a relationship to long term negative outcomes of adult criminality and poor work history. Other variables that correlate with adolescent delinquency are parental monitoring, peer deviancy, and school attachment. While there is stability in antisocial behavior, there is also change; many individuals desist from delinquency as they age. Participants in this study were adolescents involved in a longitudinal study (N = 278). Results show a high degree of stability in delinquency as well as in other correlates of delinquency. Parental monitoring, peer deviancy, and school attachment are all related to delinquency, yet when the subjects are divided into persisters (n = 73) versus desisters (n = 35), these same variables are not significantly related to desistance. This suggests that the variables related to onset may be different from those related to desistance from delinquency. Nonetheless, if one takes a more dynamic perspective of this relationship, change can be seen. Change in impulsivity, risk taking, temper, peer substance use, and school attachment relates to a deceleration in delinquent activity. Results are discussed from a developmental perspective.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCloskey, Laura A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983881en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40825139en_US
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