Freshmen music education majors' preconceived beliefs about the people and processes involved in teaching

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284201
Title:
Freshmen music education majors' preconceived beliefs about the people and processes involved in teaching
Author:
Thompson, Linda Kay
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study identifies and examines the preconceived beliefs about teaching held by entering music teachers prior to enrollment in Music Education or Education courses. Specifically it investigates the thoughts and beliefs these preservice teachers hold regarding (a) their future role as music educators, (b) their future students---as people, as learners, as musicians, (c) the process of teaching, (d) the nature of learning, and (e) what their future students should know. It also summarizes their beliefs and expectations regarding the various components of a university Music Education teacher preparation program. A "Matrix of Teaching and Learning" provides a basic for identifying general perspectives of these future teachers. Based on a purposeful selection process, twelve freshmen participated in the study. Qualitative methods of data collection included an initial open-ended questionnaire, a semi-structured interview, an interactive interview that included sort tasks and case analysis, and examination of the participants' uses of metaphor. The research questions determined a priori the primary categories for coding and analysis. Subcategories for each of the primary categories evolved through the inductive approach of constant comparative analysis. Verification occurred through maximum variation in the sample selection, triangulation, and peer review of the coding. These participants held strong beliefs about the people and processes involved in teaching--some were well developed while others were more simplistic. The theme of connection---students to subject, and teacher and students--surfaced frequently. Responses, however, did not fit the matrix. Instead, the following three themes emerged: (1) valuing the student and student empowerment, (2) predominance of the human aspect of teaching over technical aspects, and (3) the desire for experience in learning to teach, and an uncertainty about the role of the university in that process. Implications for music teacher education include the need for early and frequent opportunities for preservice teachers to develop teaching skills in as authentic a setting as possible. The importance of giving music education students the opportunity to integrate technical skills and teaching skills would appear to help develop the confidence necessary for them to successfully focus on connecting their students and the subject.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Music.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cutietta, Robert A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFreshmen music education majors' preconceived beliefs about the people and processes involved in teachingen_US
dc.creatorThompson, Linda Kayen_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Linda Kayen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study identifies and examines the preconceived beliefs about teaching held by entering music teachers prior to enrollment in Music Education or Education courses. Specifically it investigates the thoughts and beliefs these preservice teachers hold regarding (a) their future role as music educators, (b) their future students---as people, as learners, as musicians, (c) the process of teaching, (d) the nature of learning, and (e) what their future students should know. It also summarizes their beliefs and expectations regarding the various components of a university Music Education teacher preparation program. A "Matrix of Teaching and Learning" provides a basic for identifying general perspectives of these future teachers. Based on a purposeful selection process, twelve freshmen participated in the study. Qualitative methods of data collection included an initial open-ended questionnaire, a semi-structured interview, an interactive interview that included sort tasks and case analysis, and examination of the participants' uses of metaphor. The research questions determined a priori the primary categories for coding and analysis. Subcategories for each of the primary categories evolved through the inductive approach of constant comparative analysis. Verification occurred through maximum variation in the sample selection, triangulation, and peer review of the coding. These participants held strong beliefs about the people and processes involved in teaching--some were well developed while others were more simplistic. The theme of connection---students to subject, and teacher and students--surfaced frequently. Responses, however, did not fit the matrix. Instead, the following three themes emerged: (1) valuing the student and student empowerment, (2) predominance of the human aspect of teaching over technical aspects, and (3) the desire for experience in learning to teach, and an uncertainty about the role of the university in that process. Implications for music teacher education include the need for early and frequent opportunities for preservice teachers to develop teaching skills in as authentic a setting as possible. The importance of giving music education students the opportunity to integrate technical skills and teaching skills would appear to help develop the confidence necessary for them to successfully focus on connecting their students and the subject.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCutietta, Robert A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983878en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40825097en_US
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