Quality of life in family caregivers of persons with schizophrenia

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284200
Title:
Quality of life in family caregivers of persons with schizophrenia
Author:
Kwan, Tinna
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Family caregivers filled the gap between deinstitutionalization. and the shortage of community resources for persons with schizophrenia (PWS). A holistic approach for caring for the family caregivers is necessary. Discovering the quality of life and its contributing factors in family caregivers of PWS helps community mental nurses to better work with the family caregivers. This study used a descriptive design with 68 family caregivers of PWS recruited from the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) chapters in L.A. A set of questionnaires includes demographic characteristics, social resources, social stress, caregiving experiences, and quality of life were self-administered. The results showed that family caregivers reported fairly good quality of life. The quality of life was directly impacted by the positive caregiving experience, negative caregiving experience, and chronic stress. Economic resources and social resources bad indirect impact on the quality of life. There were three major findings. First, it is important to note that positive caregiving experience co-existed with negative caregiving experience, as opposed to exist on two ends of a continuum. Identifying and discussing the positive caregiving experience can help to improve the family caregiver's quality of life. Third, a parsimonious model was developed to depict factors contributing to quality of life. The family caregiver's quality of life was impacted more by the day-to-day stress than by the negative caregiving experience. Mental health nurses have to include the non-caregiving-related stress when evaluating the family caregiver's needs.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Mental Health.; Health Sciences, Nursing.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Badger, Terry A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleQuality of life in family caregivers of persons with schizophreniaen_US
dc.creatorKwan, Tinnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwan, Tinnaen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFamily caregivers filled the gap between deinstitutionalization. and the shortage of community resources for persons with schizophrenia (PWS). A holistic approach for caring for the family caregivers is necessary. Discovering the quality of life and its contributing factors in family caregivers of PWS helps community mental nurses to better work with the family caregivers. This study used a descriptive design with 68 family caregivers of PWS recruited from the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) chapters in L.A. A set of questionnaires includes demographic characteristics, social resources, social stress, caregiving experiences, and quality of life were self-administered. The results showed that family caregivers reported fairly good quality of life. The quality of life was directly impacted by the positive caregiving experience, negative caregiving experience, and chronic stress. Economic resources and social resources bad indirect impact on the quality of life. There were three major findings. First, it is important to note that positive caregiving experience co-existed with negative caregiving experience, as opposed to exist on two ends of a continuum. Identifying and discussing the positive caregiving experience can help to improve the family caregiver's quality of life. Third, a parsimonious model was developed to depict factors contributing to quality of life. The family caregiver's quality of life was impacted more by the day-to-day stress than by the negative caregiving experience. Mental health nurses have to include the non-caregiving-related stress when evaluating the family caregiver's needs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Mental Health.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBadger, Terry A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983876en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40824536en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.