Dietary fat association with nonmelanoma skin cancer among predisposed individuals

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284193
Title:
Dietary fat association with nonmelanoma skin cancer among predisposed individuals
Author:
Foote, Janet Anne
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although cell and animal studies support an association between nonmelanoma skin cancer and dietary fat, few studies have assessed this relationship among humans. This study assessed the relationship among participants in a five-year chemoprevention trial completed at the Arizona Cancer Center. This design allowed efficient investigation into the association of dietary fat with development of skin basal (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) among high risk individuals. Three manuscripts were written to examine the dietary characteristics of the study population, factors associated with basal and squamous cell skin cancer occurrence, and the association of dietary fat and other dietary components with skin cancer incidence. The hypothesis was that dietary fat, and linoleic acid in particular, would increase the risk of SCC occurrence. Using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, usual dietary intake of the volunteers, aged 51 to 85 years, was generally consistent with intakes reported by other studies. However, more than half of the participants consumed less than the recommended levels of vitamin D, folate, calcium, and dairy and grain foods. Among participants randomly assigned to the control intervention with no prior history of skin cancer, the incidence of BCC and SCC was 3629 and 2671 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Only age independently predicted BCC incidence, while male gender, naturally red hair color, years of residency in Arizona as an adult, and age predicted SCC incidence. Dietary fat was not associated with the development of BCC among these high risk individuals. Estimated daily intake of total fat and oleic acid were weakly associated with SCC occurrence (p = 0.09 and p = 0.06) and linoleic acid was not associated. Neither total dietary fat nor any specific fatty acid were associated with reduction in time to first occurrence or total number of skin cancers. Dietary vitamin C and vitamin E, antioxidants that could potentially reduce cellular protein damage from the oxidative compounds formed by ultraviolet penetration, were also not associated with BCC or SCC development.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nutrition.; Health Sciences, Public Health.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Giuliano, Anna R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDietary fat association with nonmelanoma skin cancer among predisposed individualsen_US
dc.creatorFoote, Janet Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorFoote, Janet Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough cell and animal studies support an association between nonmelanoma skin cancer and dietary fat, few studies have assessed this relationship among humans. This study assessed the relationship among participants in a five-year chemoprevention trial completed at the Arizona Cancer Center. This design allowed efficient investigation into the association of dietary fat with development of skin basal (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) among high risk individuals. Three manuscripts were written to examine the dietary characteristics of the study population, factors associated with basal and squamous cell skin cancer occurrence, and the association of dietary fat and other dietary components with skin cancer incidence. The hypothesis was that dietary fat, and linoleic acid in particular, would increase the risk of SCC occurrence. Using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, usual dietary intake of the volunteers, aged 51 to 85 years, was generally consistent with intakes reported by other studies. However, more than half of the participants consumed less than the recommended levels of vitamin D, folate, calcium, and dairy and grain foods. Among participants randomly assigned to the control intervention with no prior history of skin cancer, the incidence of BCC and SCC was 3629 and 2671 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Only age independently predicted BCC incidence, while male gender, naturally red hair color, years of residency in Arizona as an adult, and age predicted SCC incidence. Dietary fat was not associated with the development of BCC among these high risk individuals. Estimated daily intake of total fat and oleic acid were weakly associated with SCC occurrence (p = 0.09 and p = 0.06) and linoleic acid was not associated. Neither total dietary fat nor any specific fatty acid were associated with reduction in time to first occurrence or total number of skin cancers. Dietary vitamin C and vitamin E, antioxidants that could potentially reduce cellular protein damage from the oxidative compounds formed by ultraviolet penetration, were also not associated with BCC or SCC development.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGiuliano, Anna R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983864en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40823362en_US
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