Teachers' stories: Teaching American Sign Language and English literacy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284188
Title:
Teachers' stories: Teaching American Sign Language and English literacy
Author:
Gallimore, Laurene Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Educators have long recognized that the average deaf high school graduate achieves only a third to fourth grade level education. Because of the low achievement of deaf children in America, there has been a growing interest in the concept of educating deaf children bilingually, acknowledging the value of American Sign Language (ASL) and English in the classroom. In recent years, there has been a move in the field of deaf education in Europe, Canada, and the United States toward the adoption of a bilingual-bicultural (BiBi) model for language and literacy instruction for deaf students. However, because very little research has been done on ASL/English instruction and methodology, Fernandes (1997, p. 2) states, "There is ongoing reluctance in the United States to capitalize on deaf children's bilingual, bicultural capacities in promoting literacy and competence." Although several research studies have investigated the relationship between ASL and English literacy acquisition and have provided strong theoretical support for educating Deaf children bilingually, there is still a lack of study on practical strategies or "how-to's." Furthermore, the teacher-training programs in Deaf Education historically have not attracted potential applicants with fluent ASL skills and knowledge of bilingualism and literacy. Most of the programs strongly emphasize medical-pathological views rather than appropriate pedagogies that access and build upon deaf students' linguistic and cultural knowledge. Hence, this dissertation addresses practical strategies for teaching deaf students by analyzing teachers' retrospective stories on their experiences with implementing a new bilingual model in their classrooms. As adapted from Livingston's claim in her book, Rethinking the Education of Deaf Students (1996), in light of our goals, we wish to address the dire need for prospective teachers and teacher educators to rethink their views of us, Deaf people, and in doing so, rethink the theoretical underpinnings of their teaching methodologies in teacher education programs and schools.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Special.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCarty, Teresa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTeachers' stories: Teaching American Sign Language and English literacyen_US
dc.creatorGallimore, Laurene Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorGallimore, Laurene Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEducators have long recognized that the average deaf high school graduate achieves only a third to fourth grade level education. Because of the low achievement of deaf children in America, there has been a growing interest in the concept of educating deaf children bilingually, acknowledging the value of American Sign Language (ASL) and English in the classroom. In recent years, there has been a move in the field of deaf education in Europe, Canada, and the United States toward the adoption of a bilingual-bicultural (BiBi) model for language and literacy instruction for deaf students. However, because very little research has been done on ASL/English instruction and methodology, Fernandes (1997, p. 2) states, "There is ongoing reluctance in the United States to capitalize on deaf children's bilingual, bicultural capacities in promoting literacy and competence." Although several research studies have investigated the relationship between ASL and English literacy acquisition and have provided strong theoretical support for educating Deaf children bilingually, there is still a lack of study on practical strategies or "how-to's." Furthermore, the teacher-training programs in Deaf Education historically have not attracted potential applicants with fluent ASL skills and knowledge of bilingualism and literacy. Most of the programs strongly emphasize medical-pathological views rather than appropriate pedagogies that access and build upon deaf students' linguistic and cultural knowledge. Hence, this dissertation addresses practical strategies for teaching deaf students by analyzing teachers' retrospective stories on their experiences with implementing a new bilingual model in their classrooms. As adapted from Livingston's claim in her book, Rethinking the Education of Deaf Students (1996), in light of our goals, we wish to address the dire need for prospective teachers and teacher educators to rethink their views of us, Deaf people, and in doing so, rethink the theoretical underpinnings of their teaching methodologies in teacher education programs and schools.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCarty, Teresaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983855en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40821924en_US
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