Investment in female education as an economic strategy among United States-Mexican households in Nogales, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284183
Title:
Investment in female education as an economic strategy among United States-Mexican households in Nogales, Arizona
Author:
O'leary, Anna Marie Ochoa
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research examines the extent to which U.S.-Mexican households invest in the training or education of their female members as an economic strategy in Nogales, Arizona. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, the study aimed at three objectives. One objective was to isolate those factors that influence the household's ability or willingness to invest in education as a strategy in order to increase its economic stability. These factors were observed operating at two levels. At the level of labor market structure are those factors that precondition a household's ability to take the risks associated with long-term investments, such as education. At the household level, were factors that constituted sets of socially defined practices affecting the nature of an individual's productive and reproductive labor. The second objective was to analyze the interrelationship of those factors in an attempt to define comparative models of social interaction that explain how educational goals are negotiated. A final objective was to document the experiences and histories of Mexican-origin women, who in negotiating multiple roles, represent an interface between the labor markets and households; and through this information, offer new interpretations and solutions to the problem of their under-education in a region of global transformation. The results of the study indicate that investment in women's education is significantly increased with household stability. In addition, the level of investment for education of household members is raised with her increased educational attainment. It is argued that social exchange mechanisms can be used to improve the rate of education acquisition for women, and by so doing, empower the household economically.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Education, Sociology of.; Women's Studies.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Greenberg, James B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInvestment in female education as an economic strategy among United States-Mexican households in Nogales, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorO'leary, Anna Marie Ochoaen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'leary, Anna Marie Ochoaen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research examines the extent to which U.S.-Mexican households invest in the training or education of their female members as an economic strategy in Nogales, Arizona. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, the study aimed at three objectives. One objective was to isolate those factors that influence the household's ability or willingness to invest in education as a strategy in order to increase its economic stability. These factors were observed operating at two levels. At the level of labor market structure are those factors that precondition a household's ability to take the risks associated with long-term investments, such as education. At the household level, were factors that constituted sets of socially defined practices affecting the nature of an individual's productive and reproductive labor. The second objective was to analyze the interrelationship of those factors in an attempt to define comparative models of social interaction that explain how educational goals are negotiated. A final objective was to document the experiences and histories of Mexican-origin women, who in negotiating multiple roles, represent an interface between the labor markets and households; and through this information, offer new interpretations and solutions to the problem of their under-education in a region of global transformation. The results of the study indicate that investment in women's education is significantly increased with household stability. In addition, the level of investment for education of household members is raised with her increased educational attainment. It is argued that social exchange mechanisms can be used to improve the rate of education acquisition for women, and by so doing, empower the household economically.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Sociology of.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGreenberg, James B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927447en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39559531en_US
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