Adult readers' eye movements during the production of oral miscues

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284147
Title:
Adult readers' eye movements during the production of oral miscues
Author:
Paulson, Eric John
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Miscue analysis and eye-movement recording technology are combined in this dissertation to explore the reading processes of adult, skilled readers. The combination of approaches forms a new reading research methodology termed Eye Movement Miscue Analysis, or EMMA, that provides a powerful view of the reading process. Miscue analysis, the psycholinguistic analysis of unexpected responses in a reader's oral text, provides a verbal dimension of data for reading research. Similarly, eye-movement recording, which shows precisely where in a text a reader looks, provides a visual dimension of data. When these two research approaches are combined, both verbal and visual data are analyzed, resulting in a powerful, multi-dimensional view of the reading process. This dissertation focuses on adult readers' eye movements made during the production of miscues and other oral reading phenomena. Patterns of eye movements relative to substitutions, omissions, insertions, partials, and repetitions are described, analyzed, and compared. Results of the analysis are discussed in terms of whether current causal explanations of miscues are augmented or refuted. Original conceptions about the reading process formed as a result of this research are developed and placed in existing theoretical frameworks. Major findings include that the eye movements relative to different types of miscues and other oral reading phenomena exhibit different patterns, and both eye movements and miscues, and the relationship between them, are functions of comprehension. Also, contrary to conventional wisdom, most miscued words are examined, and examined thoroughly, before the miscue is produced; miscues are not caused by careless or reckless reading, or visually skipping words. Implications for theories and models of the reading process are discussed, and areas of needed research are described.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Reading.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goodman, Yetta M.; Goodman, Kenneth S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAdult readers' eye movements during the production of oral miscuesen_US
dc.creatorPaulson, Eric Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaulson, Eric Johnen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMiscue analysis and eye-movement recording technology are combined in this dissertation to explore the reading processes of adult, skilled readers. The combination of approaches forms a new reading research methodology termed Eye Movement Miscue Analysis, or EMMA, that provides a powerful view of the reading process. Miscue analysis, the psycholinguistic analysis of unexpected responses in a reader's oral text, provides a verbal dimension of data for reading research. Similarly, eye-movement recording, which shows precisely where in a text a reader looks, provides a visual dimension of data. When these two research approaches are combined, both verbal and visual data are analyzed, resulting in a powerful, multi-dimensional view of the reading process. This dissertation focuses on adult readers' eye movements made during the production of miscues and other oral reading phenomena. Patterns of eye movements relative to substitutions, omissions, insertions, partials, and repetitions are described, analyzed, and compared. Results of the analysis are discussed in terms of whether current causal explanations of miscues are augmented or refuted. Original conceptions about the reading process formed as a result of this research are developed and placed in existing theoretical frameworks. Major findings include that the eye movements relative to different types of miscues and other oral reading phenomena exhibit different patterns, and both eye movements and miscues, and the relationship between them, are functions of comprehension. Also, contrary to conventional wisdom, most miscued words are examined, and examined thoroughly, before the miscue is produced; miscues are not caused by careless or reckless reading, or visually skipping words. Implications for theories and models of the reading process are discussed, and areas of needed research are described.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Reading.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Kenneth S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9972086en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40638406en_US
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