Self-control and deviant behavior in organizations: The case of sexually harassing behavior

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284115
Title:
Self-control and deviant behavior in organizations: The case of sexually harassing behavior
Author:
Done, Robert Stacy
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation consists of four analyses that examine the relationship between self-control and the likelihood of sexual harassment as deviant behavior in organizations. It was hypothesized that those men and women with lower self-control would also be more likely to engage in sexually harassing behavior. All of the analyses are based on a sample of undergraduate students and a sample of jury pool members. In the first analysis, the psychometric properties of multiple self-control measures were examined. The internal consistency and validity of three self-control measures were examined to determine which of the scales were appropriate for this research. Two of the scales were selected as suitably consistent and valid and were used in subsequent analyses. In the second analysis, the relationship between self-control and the likelihood to engage in sexually harassing behavior was explored. This exploration was conducted using two self-control measures and measures representing the likelihood of both quid pro quo and hostile work environment sexual harassment. In support of proposed hypothesis, those who reported lower self-control also reported a higher likelihood of engaging in sexually harassing behavior. In the third analysis, the predictive ability of a composite self-control measure and its components were compared. Factor analyses revealed the structure that the measure was designed to contain. The components revealed marginal reliability and were relatively ineffective predictors of the likelihood to engage in sexually harassing behavior as compared to the composite measure. And in the fourth analysis, the effectiveness of sexual harassment policies in light of self-control is studied. Policies prohibiting sexual harassment are suggested to reduce this type of behavior, but little empirical research has examined this proposed relationship. This analysis suggests that sexual harassment policies have a consistent, but weak, effect on reducing sexual harassment. Thus, this research has a number of implications. These findings inform theories of sexual harassment, which are often gender-based, and theories of deviant behavior, which are often context-based. These findings also contribute to the use of multiple self-control measures in future research. And finally, the findings suggest practical ways that managers may be able to reduce sexually harassing behaviors in organizations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Law.; Psychology, Social.; Business Administration, Management.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Industrial Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gutek, Barbara A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSelf-control and deviant behavior in organizations: The case of sexually harassing behavioren_US
dc.creatorDone, Robert Stacyen_US
dc.contributor.authorDone, Robert Stacyen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation consists of four analyses that examine the relationship between self-control and the likelihood of sexual harassment as deviant behavior in organizations. It was hypothesized that those men and women with lower self-control would also be more likely to engage in sexually harassing behavior. All of the analyses are based on a sample of undergraduate students and a sample of jury pool members. In the first analysis, the psychometric properties of multiple self-control measures were examined. The internal consistency and validity of three self-control measures were examined to determine which of the scales were appropriate for this research. Two of the scales were selected as suitably consistent and valid and were used in subsequent analyses. In the second analysis, the relationship between self-control and the likelihood to engage in sexually harassing behavior was explored. This exploration was conducted using two self-control measures and measures representing the likelihood of both quid pro quo and hostile work environment sexual harassment. In support of proposed hypothesis, those who reported lower self-control also reported a higher likelihood of engaging in sexually harassing behavior. In the third analysis, the predictive ability of a composite self-control measure and its components were compared. Factor analyses revealed the structure that the measure was designed to contain. The components revealed marginal reliability and were relatively ineffective predictors of the likelihood to engage in sexually harassing behavior as compared to the composite measure. And in the fourth analysis, the effectiveness of sexual harassment policies in light of self-control is studied. Policies prohibiting sexual harassment are suggested to reduce this type of behavior, but little empirical research has examined this proposed relationship. This analysis suggests that sexual harassment policies have a consistent, but weak, effect on reducing sexual harassment. Thus, this research has a number of implications. These findings inform theories of sexual harassment, which are often gender-based, and theories of deviant behavior, which are often context-based. These findings also contribute to the use of multiple self-control measures in future research. And finally, the findings suggest practical ways that managers may be able to reduce sexually harassing behaviors in organizations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLaw.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGutek, Barbara A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9965906en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40482157en_US
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