Bullies, fights and guns: Self-control theory as an explanation for juvenile use of intimidation and violence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284072
Title:
Bullies, fights and guns: Self-control theory as an explanation for juvenile use of intimidation and violence
Author:
Nofziger, Stacey Diane
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Examinations of juvenile violence have largely been limited in both the scope of behaviors studied and the variety of theories used to explain these actions. This study addresses these issues by applying a test of Gottfredson and Hirschi's (1990) general theory of crime to an examination of a wide range of violent and intimidating acts. Specifically, the effects of self-control and opportunity on bullying, righting and weapon related behaviors are tested. This analysis finds that greater self-control, as measured by a combination of attitudinal and behavioral items, significantly decreases all forms of intimidation and violence examined. Similarly, greater opportunity, operationalized as a combination of parental supervision, participation in unstructured activities, and peer deviance, increases each form of behavior. In addition, each model provides support for the theoretically based hypothesis that greater self-control decreases opportunity. Therefore, this study provides a great deal of support for self-control theory.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
England, Paula

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBullies, fights and guns: Self-control theory as an explanation for juvenile use of intimidation and violenceen_US
dc.creatorNofziger, Stacey Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorNofziger, Stacey Dianeen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractExaminations of juvenile violence have largely been limited in both the scope of behaviors studied and the variety of theories used to explain these actions. This study addresses these issues by applying a test of Gottfredson and Hirschi's (1990) general theory of crime to an examination of a wide range of violent and intimidating acts. Specifically, the effects of self-control and opportunity on bullying, righting and weapon related behaviors are tested. This analysis finds that greater self-control, as measured by a combination of attitudinal and behavioral items, significantly decreases all forms of intimidation and violence examined. Similarly, greater opportunity, operationalized as a combination of parental supervision, participation in unstructured activities, and peer deviance, increases each form of behavior. In addition, each model provides support for the theoretically based hypothesis that greater self-control decreases opportunity. Therefore, this study provides a great deal of support for self-control theory.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEngland, Paulaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927481en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39566122en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.