Exploring children's views of themselves as learners within an inquiry-based curriculum

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284033
Title:
Exploring children's views of themselves as learners within an inquiry-based curriculum
Author:
Kauffman, Gloria
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore how children in a third grade classroom came to understand the processes that helped them revalue themselves as learners. In addition, they identified the types of support structures that helped them revalue themselves as learners in an inquiry based curriculum. Qualitative research was determined to be the most suitable methodology for this study, given the research questions and their relationship to the engagements and the learning experiences in this classroom. The curricular framework dictated that the research design needed to include data that reflected the ongoing nature of learning as a process of inquiry. Data analysis was based on open coding and a method of constant comparison. Multiple data sources included daily field notes with anecdotal notes on significant events; a teacher journal of reflections; collected student responses, Sketch to Stretches, picture reflections, portfolios, and journal entries. Children described, defined, and redefined themselves as learners through the continuous building of reciprocal relationships with their peers and teacher, encouraging them to find their voice through action and reflection. Children identified the roles of their class participants, the connection they made in and across the curriculum, their personal and social inquiries, and the expectation of change, as the multiple structures that supported them in their learning. My purpose was to contribute insights into how students and teachers might better address the issue of curriculum for the purpose of allowing learners to be more self-reflective learners. Findings suggest that reflective thinking is a tool for growth as a learner and needs to be a continuous part of the curriculum. Sign systems need to be tools for expanding learning potentials so classrooms can be critical thinking communities. Learning is enhanced when relationships are reciprocal. A curriculum that emphasizes a problem-posing approach motivates students and encourages both students and teachers to engage in curricular decisions making curriculum dynamic.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Language and Literature.; Education, Elementary.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fox, Dana L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExploring children's views of themselves as learners within an inquiry-based curriculumen_US
dc.creatorKauffman, Gloriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKauffman, Gloriaen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore how children in a third grade classroom came to understand the processes that helped them revalue themselves as learners. In addition, they identified the types of support structures that helped them revalue themselves as learners in an inquiry based curriculum. Qualitative research was determined to be the most suitable methodology for this study, given the research questions and their relationship to the engagements and the learning experiences in this classroom. The curricular framework dictated that the research design needed to include data that reflected the ongoing nature of learning as a process of inquiry. Data analysis was based on open coding and a method of constant comparison. Multiple data sources included daily field notes with anecdotal notes on significant events; a teacher journal of reflections; collected student responses, Sketch to Stretches, picture reflections, portfolios, and journal entries. Children described, defined, and redefined themselves as learners through the continuous building of reciprocal relationships with their peers and teacher, encouraging them to find their voice through action and reflection. Children identified the roles of their class participants, the connection they made in and across the curriculum, their personal and social inquiries, and the expectation of change, as the multiple structures that supported them in their learning. My purpose was to contribute insights into how students and teachers might better address the issue of curriculum for the purpose of allowing learners to be more self-reflective learners. Findings suggest that reflective thinking is a tool for growth as a learner and needs to be a continuous part of the curriculum. Sign systems need to be tools for expanding learning potentials so classrooms can be critical thinking communities. Learning is enhanced when relationships are reciprocal. A curriculum that emphasizes a problem-posing approach motivates students and encourages both students and teachers to engage in curricular decisions making curriculum dynamic.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFox, Dana L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9957985en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40150185en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.