Phase development, microstructure, and ferroelectric properties of sol-gel derived strontium bismuth tantalate thin films

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284019
Title:
Phase development, microstructure, and ferroelectric properties of sol-gel derived strontium bismuth tantalate thin films
Author:
Dawley, Jeffrey Todd
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ferroelectric materials have been studied extensively over the past decade or so as potential candidates for memory applications, since they possess a unique set of properties, including fast polarization switching and non-volatility. The two major candidate materials being studied for integration into ferroelectric random access memories (FeRAMs) are lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi₂Ta₂O₉ or SBT). Overall, PZT has probably been the most extensively studied of the two materials, however SBT has received a lot of attention over the past few years due to its fatigue resistance, large remanent polarization (Pᵣ), and low coercive field (E(c)) on standard metal electrodes. The purpose of this project was to study the factors that influence the development of ferroelectric properties of sol-gel derived SBT thin films, including composition, heat treatment, phase development, and microstructure. The results show that SBT crystallite size is the single most important factor in determining the ferroelectric properties of SBT compositions with Sr contents ranging from stoichiometric to 20% deficient. SBT volume fraction also plays an important role. Therefore, composition, heat treatment, etc., are only important in that they help establish the SBT crystallite size and SBT area fraction of a particular film. Two strategies for improving the polarization of SBT at lower temperatures, which include the use of highly Sr deficient films, and Bi₂O₃ coatings as a flux, were also studied.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Condensed Matter.; Engineering, Materials Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Materials Science and Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zelinski, Brian J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePhase development, microstructure, and ferroelectric properties of sol-gel derived strontium bismuth tantalate thin filmsen_US
dc.creatorDawley, Jeffrey Todden_US
dc.contributor.authorDawley, Jeffrey Todden_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFerroelectric materials have been studied extensively over the past decade or so as potential candidates for memory applications, since they possess a unique set of properties, including fast polarization switching and non-volatility. The two major candidate materials being studied for integration into ferroelectric random access memories (FeRAMs) are lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi₂Ta₂O₉ or SBT). Overall, PZT has probably been the most extensively studied of the two materials, however SBT has received a lot of attention over the past few years due to its fatigue resistance, large remanent polarization (Pᵣ), and low coercive field (E(c)) on standard metal electrodes. The purpose of this project was to study the factors that influence the development of ferroelectric properties of sol-gel derived SBT thin films, including composition, heat treatment, phase development, and microstructure. The results show that SBT crystallite size is the single most important factor in determining the ferroelectric properties of SBT compositions with Sr contents ranging from stoichiometric to 20% deficient. SBT volume fraction also plays an important role. Therefore, composition, heat treatment, etc., are only important in that they help establish the SBT crystallite size and SBT area fraction of a particular film. Two strategies for improving the polarization of SBT at lower temperatures, which include the use of highly Sr deficient films, and Bi₂O₃ coatings as a flux, were also studied.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Condensed Matter.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZelinski, Brian J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9957961en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40143326en_US
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