Alexander Tcherepnin's "Five Concert Studies": An homage to Chinese musical styles, instruments, and traditions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284005
Title:
Alexander Tcherepnin's "Five Concert Studies": An homage to Chinese musical styles, instruments, and traditions
Author:
Wang, Tianshu
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The influence of traditional Chinese art permeates Alexander Tcherepnin's piano compositions, particularly his Five Concert Studies, Op. 52 . A survey of Tcherepnin's life, his musical achievements, and the impact various cultural influences exerted on his musical development reveals the depth of feeling Tcherepnin possessed for China and things Chinese. As a product of Tcherepnin's "Chinese Years" (1934--1937), the Five Concert Studies, Op. 52, show the direct influence of specific Chinese elements and original art forms that the composer imitated, including the Pi Ying Xi (Shadow Play), Mu Ou Xi (a traditional puppet show that Tcherepnin translated as Punch and Judy ), and the sound of the pipa (a guitar-like plucked instrument) and the qin (a zither-like stringed instrument or lute). Alexander Tcherepnin could not have written these pieces without firsthand knowledge of the Chinese culture to which he was deeply attracted. The Five Concert Studies are a culmination of his initial travels in China, his involvement with the development of an indigenous Chinese school of piano writing and his great love for the Chinese people.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Music.
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zumbro, Nicholas L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAlexander Tcherepnin's "Five Concert Studies": An homage to Chinese musical styles, instruments, and traditionsen_US
dc.creatorWang, Tianshuen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Tianshuen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe influence of traditional Chinese art permeates Alexander Tcherepnin's piano compositions, particularly his Five Concert Studies, Op. 52 . A survey of Tcherepnin's life, his musical achievements, and the impact various cultural influences exerted on his musical development reveals the depth of feeling Tcherepnin possessed for China and things Chinese. As a product of Tcherepnin's "Chinese Years" (1934--1937), the Five Concert Studies, Op. 52, show the direct influence of specific Chinese elements and original art forms that the composer imitated, including the Pi Ying Xi (Shadow Play), Mu Ou Xi (a traditional puppet show that Tcherepnin translated as Punch and Judy ), and the sound of the pipa (a guitar-like plucked instrument) and the qin (a zither-like stringed instrument or lute). Alexander Tcherepnin could not have written these pieces without firsthand knowledge of the Chinese culture to which he was deeply attracted. The Five Concert Studies are a culmination of his initial travels in China, his involvement with the development of an indigenous Chinese school of piano writing and his great love for the Chinese people.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZumbro, Nicholas L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927469en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39560223en_US
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