Development, characterization, and modeling of a tunable filter camera

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/283972
Title:
Development, characterization, and modeling of a tunable filter camera
Author:
Sartor, Mark Alan
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper describes the development, characterization, and modeling of a Tunable Filter Camera (TFC). The TFC is a new multispectral instrument with electronically tuned spectral filtering and low-light-level sensitivity. It represents a hybrid between hyperspectral and multispectral imaging spectrometers that incorporates advantages from each, addressing issues such as complexity, cost, lack of sensitivity, and adaptability. These capabilities allow the TFC to be applied to low-altitude video surveillance for real-time spectral and spatial target detection and image exploitation. Described herein are the theory and principles of operation for the TFC, which includes a liquid crystal tunable filter, an intensified CCD, and a custom apochromatic lens. The results of proof-of-concept testing, and characterization of two prototype cameras are included, along with a summary of the design analyses for the development of a multiple-channel system. A significant result of this effort was the creation of a system-level model, which was used to facilitate development and predict performance. It includes models for the liquid crystal tunable filter and intensified CCD. Such modeling was necessary in the design of the system and is useful for evaluation of the system in remote-sensing applications. Also presented are characterization data from component testing, which included quantitative results for linearity, signal to noise ratio (SNR), linearity, and radiometric response. These data were used to help refine and validate the model. For a pre-defined source, the spatial and spectral response, and the noise of the camera, system can now be predicted. The innovation that sets this development apart is the fact that this instrument has been designed for integrated, multi-channel operation for the express purpose of real-time detection/identification in low-light-level conditions. Many of the requirements for the TFC were derived from this mission. In order to provide background for the design requirements for the TFC development, the mission and principles of operation behind the multi-channel system will be reviewed. Given the combination of the flexibility, simplicity, and sensitivity, the TFC and its multiple-channel extension can play a significant role in the next generation of remote-sensing instruments.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Optics.; Remote Sensing.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gaskill, Jack D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDevelopment, characterization, and modeling of a tunable filter cameraen_US
dc.creatorSartor, Mark Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorSartor, Mark Alanen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes the development, characterization, and modeling of a Tunable Filter Camera (TFC). The TFC is a new multispectral instrument with electronically tuned spectral filtering and low-light-level sensitivity. It represents a hybrid between hyperspectral and multispectral imaging spectrometers that incorporates advantages from each, addressing issues such as complexity, cost, lack of sensitivity, and adaptability. These capabilities allow the TFC to be applied to low-altitude video surveillance for real-time spectral and spatial target detection and image exploitation. Described herein are the theory and principles of operation for the TFC, which includes a liquid crystal tunable filter, an intensified CCD, and a custom apochromatic lens. The results of proof-of-concept testing, and characterization of two prototype cameras are included, along with a summary of the design analyses for the development of a multiple-channel system. A significant result of this effort was the creation of a system-level model, which was used to facilitate development and predict performance. It includes models for the liquid crystal tunable filter and intensified CCD. Such modeling was necessary in the design of the system and is useful for evaluation of the system in remote-sensing applications. Also presented are characterization data from component testing, which included quantitative results for linearity, signal to noise ratio (SNR), linearity, and radiometric response. These data were used to help refine and validate the model. For a pre-defined source, the spatial and spectral response, and the noise of the camera, system can now be predicted. The innovation that sets this development apart is the fact that this instrument has been designed for integrated, multi-channel operation for the express purpose of real-time detection/identification in low-light-level conditions. Many of the requirements for the TFC were derived from this mission. In order to provide background for the design requirements for the TFC development, the mission and principles of operation behind the multi-channel system will be reviewed. Given the combination of the flexibility, simplicity, and sensitivity, the TFC and its multiple-channel extension can play a significant role in the next generation of remote-sensing instruments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
dc.subjectRemote Sensing.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGaskill, Jack D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927462en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39559981en_US
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