Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/283732
Title:
Ah'ani'nin Oral History
Author:
Brockie, Clarena Mary
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 25-Oct-2013
Abstract:
In earlier times An'ani'nin lived together and in the winter months retold oral histories and stories, especially those which they wanted to impress upon the people as important to remember. Children were taught lessons through oral history. The youth also participated in ceremonies, learned the songs, lived as the Ah'ani'nin taught them and were told the importance of the way of the life of the An'ani'nin. This is how they kept a record of their ceremonies, cutlure, their kinship relations, their economy and governance. By practice and re-telling the history their culture was maintained. Stories were told as women worked, and in the evening when men were off hunting or at social or religious gatherings. In this thesis, I have collected stories about the Ah'ani'nin, stories of legends, history, the trickster stories and discussed how these stories in the past helped the Ah'ani'nin and how they can help the people today.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Parezo, Nancy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAh'ani'nin Oral Historyen_US
dc.creatorBrockie, Clarena Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrockie, Clarena Maryen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 25-Oct-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractIn earlier times An'ani'nin lived together and in the winter months retold oral histories and stories, especially those which they wanted to impress upon the people as important to remember. Children were taught lessons through oral history. The youth also participated in ceremonies, learned the songs, lived as the Ah'ani'nin taught them and were told the importance of the way of the life of the An'ani'nin. This is how they kept a record of their ceremonies, cutlure, their kinship relations, their economy and governance. By practice and re-telling the history their culture was maintained. Stories were told as women worked, and in the evening when men were off hunting or at social or religious gatherings. In this thesis, I have collected stories about the Ah'ani'nin, stories of legends, history, the trickster stories and discussed how these stories in the past helped the Ah'ani'nin and how they can help the people today.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorParezo, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberColombi, Benen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFox, Mary Joen_US
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