Development of Vapor Sensors for Volatile Museum Contaminants by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/283712
Title:
Development of Vapor Sensors for Volatile Museum Contaminants by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)
Author:
Madden, Odile Marguerite
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Detection and identification of pesticide residues on objects of cultural heritage is a serious and urgent challenge that currently faces many museums, Native American communities, and private collections worldwide. Organic artifact materials, such as wood, animal hide, basketry, textiles, paper, horn and bone, have traditionally been treated with pesticides to eradicate and prevent infestation by insects, rodents, and mold. These poisonous substances can persist for years in the controlled environment of a museum storeroom and present a potential poisoning risk to people who come in contact with the objects. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has the potential to detect volatile organic pesticides in this context. The technique can overcome the insensitivity of normal Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence interference, and make possible detection of many organic compounds in parts per million concentration. This investigation is aimed at evaluating SERS for the detection and identification of volatiles in museums, with emphasis on naphthalene vapor. The potential of several SERS-active materials; Tollens mirrors, gold film over nanosphere arrays, citrate-stabilized colloidal silver, and nanoporous gold; to detect Rhodamine B and naphthalene is investigated. The research also highlights the mechanisms that underlie SERS, and the relationship between substrate nanostructure and SERS performance.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Naphthalene; Pesticide; Raman; SERS; Tollens; Materials Science & Engineering; Heritage preservation science
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Materials Science & Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Odegaard, Nancy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of Vapor Sensors for Volatile Museum Contaminants by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)en_US
dc.creatorMadden, Odile Margueriteen_US
dc.contributor.authorMadden, Odile Margueriteen_US
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDetection and identification of pesticide residues on objects of cultural heritage is a serious and urgent challenge that currently faces many museums, Native American communities, and private collections worldwide. Organic artifact materials, such as wood, animal hide, basketry, textiles, paper, horn and bone, have traditionally been treated with pesticides to eradicate and prevent infestation by insects, rodents, and mold. These poisonous substances can persist for years in the controlled environment of a museum storeroom and present a potential poisoning risk to people who come in contact with the objects. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has the potential to detect volatile organic pesticides in this context. The technique can overcome the insensitivity of normal Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence interference, and make possible detection of many organic compounds in parts per million concentration. This investigation is aimed at evaluating SERS for the detection and identification of volatiles in museums, with emphasis on naphthalene vapor. The potential of several SERS-active materials; Tollens mirrors, gold film over nanosphere arrays, citrate-stabilized colloidal silver, and nanoporous gold; to detect Rhodamine B and naphthalene is investigated. The research also highlights the mechanisms that underlie SERS, and the relationship between substrate nanostructure and SERS performance.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectNaphthaleneen_US
dc.subjectPesticideen_US
dc.subjectRamanen_US
dc.subjectSERSen_US
dc.subjectTollensen_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science & Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectHeritage preservation scienceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science & Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOdegaard, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSimmons, Joseph H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPotter, Barrett G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVandiver, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOdegaard, Nancyen_US
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