A Parametric Evaluation of the Location Dependent Drug Transport Properties of Coronary Arteries

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/283607
Title:
A Parametric Evaluation of the Location Dependent Drug Transport Properties of Coronary Arteries
Author:
Keyes, Joseph Thomas
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 11-Mar-2015
Abstract:
Plaque accumulation in the walls of coronary arteries reduces the delivery of nutrients and oxygen to the myocardium. This luminal narrowing can cause clinical indications such as angina or heart attacks, and without treatment, can be fatal. One method of treatment is the percutaneous intervention of stents to re-canalize the vessel. A potential complication of stent implantation is arterial wall remodeling and renarrowing of the vessel; termed restenosis. This can be prevented in the majority of patients with an antiproliferative drug coating on the surface of the stent: a drug-eluting stent. I hypothesize that drug transport in the arterial wall from these devices varies between arterial locations (left anterior descending (LADC) versus right (RC) coronary artery; proximal, middle, versus distal regions). The purpose of this work was to identify the properties of the vascular wall that govern transport, and computationally model stent-based delivery to better understand any differences that could exist in transport based on location. The first aim of this work was to identify the porohyperelastic properties. Permeability showed a decrease along the length of the LADC artery of 198%, and 98.6% along the length of the RC artery (p=NS between LADC and RC). Mechanical properties indicated significant differences between the LADC and RC arteries, with the LADC artery being stiffer than the RC. The second aim of this work was to identify the mass transport and cellular binding properties. There was no difference between the LADC and RC arteries; however, diffusivity peaked in the middle region of both arteries by a factor of 2.07. Convection coupling coefficients indicated an upward trend down each artery with the RC artery having higher values. The third aim was to use the model constants from the previous two aims to create six parametric computational models of stent deployment and drug delivery into the respective arterial sections. Results indicated that RC sections had lower stress along with 2.2 times the species concentration at time points of peak smooth muscle cell migration and remodeling.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
biomechanics; coronary; drug; stent; transport; Biomedical Engineering; artery
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Biomedical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Vande Geest, Jonathan P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Parametric Evaluation of the Location Dependent Drug Transport Properties of Coronary Arteriesen_US
dc.creatorKeyes, Joseph Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorKeyes, Joseph Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 11-Mar-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractPlaque accumulation in the walls of coronary arteries reduces the delivery of nutrients and oxygen to the myocardium. This luminal narrowing can cause clinical indications such as angina or heart attacks, and without treatment, can be fatal. One method of treatment is the percutaneous intervention of stents to re-canalize the vessel. A potential complication of stent implantation is arterial wall remodeling and renarrowing of the vessel; termed restenosis. This can be prevented in the majority of patients with an antiproliferative drug coating on the surface of the stent: a drug-eluting stent. I hypothesize that drug transport in the arterial wall from these devices varies between arterial locations (left anterior descending (LADC) versus right (RC) coronary artery; proximal, middle, versus distal regions). The purpose of this work was to identify the properties of the vascular wall that govern transport, and computationally model stent-based delivery to better understand any differences that could exist in transport based on location. The first aim of this work was to identify the porohyperelastic properties. Permeability showed a decrease along the length of the LADC artery of 198%, and 98.6% along the length of the RC artery (p=NS between LADC and RC). Mechanical properties indicated significant differences between the LADC and RC arteries, with the LADC artery being stiffer than the RC. The second aim of this work was to identify the mass transport and cellular binding properties. There was no difference between the LADC and RC arteries; however, diffusivity peaked in the middle region of both arteries by a factor of 2.07. Convection coupling coefficients indicated an upward trend down each artery with the RC artery having higher values. The third aim was to use the model constants from the previous two aims to create six parametric computational models of stent deployment and drug delivery into the respective arterial sections. Results indicated that RC sections had lower stress along with 2.2 times the species concentration at time points of peak smooth muscle cell migration and remodeling.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectbiomechanicsen_US
dc.subjectcoronaryen_US
dc.subjectdrugen_US
dc.subjectstenten_US
dc.subjecttransporten_US
dc.subjectBiomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectarteryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVande Geest, Jonathan P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSecomb, Timothyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSimon, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUtzinger, Ursen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVande Geest, Jonathan P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWu, Xiaoyuen_US
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