Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/283604
Title:
Shape Memory Alloy Fracture as a Deployment Actuator
Author:
Buban, Darrick Matthew
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Many applications require deployable structures to meet operational objectives such as satellites that unfurl antenna arrays. Typically, most deployment efforts involve the use of explosive and non-explosive actuators (EAs and NEAs respectively) that have implementation drawbacks such as the expense associated with special handling and the bulk encountered with mounting the devices. To mitigate EA and NEA drawbacks, the integration of shape memory alloys (SMA) as a deployment actuator was investigated. SMA specimens were heated and pulled to failure developing an environmental and structural operating envelope for application as deployment mechanisms. A Finite Element Model (FEM) was also created to model the response behavior induced during specimen testing so that modeled performance could be used in lieu of testing when integrating SMA actuators into deployment systems. Experimental results verified that SMAs can be implemented as deployment actuators. Recorded data showed that SMA fracture is possible over a wide range of temperatures and strains, filling a material performance gap not found in the literature. The obtained information allows design engineers to appropriately size SMAs given design requirements achieving the desired deployment effects. The Finite Element Model was partially successful, capable of emulating strained ambient material behavior up to approximately 6.1%. The limited response is due to lack of experimentally derived large stress and strain available for model emulation.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Deployment; Finite Element; Fracture; Nitinol; Shape Memory; Engineering Mechanics; Actuator
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Engineering Mechanics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Frantziskonis, George

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleShape Memory Alloy Fracture as a Deployment Actuatoren_US
dc.creatorBuban, Darrick Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuban, Darrick Matthewen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMany applications require deployable structures to meet operational objectives such as satellites that unfurl antenna arrays. Typically, most deployment efforts involve the use of explosive and non-explosive actuators (EAs and NEAs respectively) that have implementation drawbacks such as the expense associated with special handling and the bulk encountered with mounting the devices. To mitigate EA and NEA drawbacks, the integration of shape memory alloys (SMA) as a deployment actuator was investigated. SMA specimens were heated and pulled to failure developing an environmental and structural operating envelope for application as deployment mechanisms. A Finite Element Model (FEM) was also created to model the response behavior induced during specimen testing so that modeled performance could be used in lieu of testing when integrating SMA actuators into deployment systems. Experimental results verified that SMAs can be implemented as deployment actuators. Recorded data showed that SMA fracture is possible over a wide range of temperatures and strains, filling a material performance gap not found in the literature. The obtained information allows design engineers to appropriately size SMAs given design requirements achieving the desired deployment effects. The Finite Element Model was partially successful, capable of emulating strained ambient material behavior up to approximately 6.1%. The limited response is due to lack of experimentally derived large stress and strain available for model emulation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDeploymenten_US
dc.subjectFinite Elementen_US
dc.subjectFractureen_US
dc.subjectNitinolen_US
dc.subjectShape Memoryen_US
dc.subjectEngineering Mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectActuatoren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEngineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFrantziskonis, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUhlmann, Donalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMuralidharan, Krishnaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFrantziskonis, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFleischman, Roberten_US
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