Other People's Money: Adapting Entrepreneurial Techniques to Build Capital in Challenging Economic Times

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/283595
Title:
Other People's Money: Adapting Entrepreneurial Techniques to Build Capital in Challenging Economic Times
Author:
Farrell, Robert
Affiliation:
Lehman College, City University of New York
Citation:
Other People's Money: Adapting Entrepreneurial Techniques to Build Capital in Challenging Economic Times 2011, 18 (2-3):150 College & Undergraduate Libraries
Journal:
College & Undergraduate Libraries
Issue Date:
23-Apr-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/283595
DOI:
10.1080/10691316.2011.577685
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10691316.2011.577685
Abstract:
Drawing on the “predator” model of ntrepreneurship put forward by Villette and Vuillermot in their 2009 book “From Predators to Icons,” this article argues that challenging economic times reveal that self-funded, collaborative information literacy models have in many cases unsustainably overstretched staff and budgets. In such circumstances, it is necessary for librarians to shift to an entrepreneurial approach that seeks profitable opportunities funded by parties other than the library in order to build capital for current and future instructional services. Following Villette and Vuillermot, the article seeks to refute a cultural myth that sees the entrepreneur as someone who is first and foremost a “do-gooder” or marketer of helpful products, and it also advocates that librarians adopt a view of the entrepreneur as one who preys on unexploited, lowcost/high-profit opportunities to leverage “other people’s money” to build capital for later innovation. The article considers the economics of information literacy and library instruction programs, provides historical context for what has come to be known as the “collaborative imperative,” points to the economic shortsightedness of many collaborative and “embedded librarian” partnerships, and details six examples from information literacy programs that model successful entrepreneurship of the sort argued for.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
entrepreneurship; collaboration; economic sustainability; information literacy; economic crises; austerity; library instruction programs
ISSN:
1069-1316; 1545-2530

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-23T00:04:19Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-23T00:04:19Z-
dc.date.issued2013-04-23-
dc.identifier.citationOther People's Money: Adapting Entrepreneurial Techniques to Build Capital in Challenging Economic Times 2011, 18 (2-3):150 College & Undergraduate Librariesen_US
dc.identifier.issn1069-1316-
dc.identifier.issn1545-2530-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10691316.2011.577685-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/283595-
dc.description.abstractDrawing on the “predator” model of ntrepreneurship put forward by Villette and Vuillermot in their 2009 book “From Predators to Icons,” this article argues that challenging economic times reveal that self-funded, collaborative information literacy models have in many cases unsustainably overstretched staff and budgets. In such circumstances, it is necessary for librarians to shift to an entrepreneurial approach that seeks profitable opportunities funded by parties other than the library in order to build capital for current and future instructional services. Following Villette and Vuillermot, the article seeks to refute a cultural myth that sees the entrepreneur as someone who is first and foremost a “do-gooder” or marketer of helpful products, and it also advocates that librarians adopt a view of the entrepreneur as one who preys on unexploited, lowcost/high-profit opportunities to leverage “other people’s money” to build capital for later innovation. The article considers the economics of information literacy and library instruction programs, provides historical context for what has come to be known as the “collaborative imperative,” points to the economic shortsightedness of many collaborative and “embedded librarian” partnerships, and details six examples from information literacy programs that model successful entrepreneurship of the sort argued for.en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10691316.2011.577685en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to College & Undergraduate Librariesen_US
dc.subjectentrepreneurshipen_US
dc.subjectcollaborationen_US
dc.subjecteconomic sustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectinformation literacyen_US
dc.subjecteconomic crisesen_US
dc.subjectausterityen_US
dc.subjectlibrary instruction programsen_US
dc.titleOther People's Money: Adapting Entrepreneurial Techniques to Build Capital in Challenging Economic Times-
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLehman College, City University of New Yorken_US
dc.identifier.journalCollege & Undergraduate Librariesen_US
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