Whole language in preservice teacher education: The story of Mechelle

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282864
Title:
Whole language in preservice teacher education: The story of Mechelle
Author:
Yokota, Reiko
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This qualitative case study examines the influence of a whole language methods course on a preservice teacher's ideas and student teaching performance. In addition it explores significant problems the participant had when she attempted to apply theory in practice and the influence of block instructors, classroom teachers, primary school students, and block classmates on the participant's development in whole language. The study took place during the participant's whole language block semester at the University of Arizona in Tucson, in which preservice teachers learned teaching methods in language arts, reading, and social studies through both classroom sessions and a practicum, at Borton Primary Magnet School, whose principal was a well-known proponent of whole language education. The participant's apprenticeship classroom teacher utilized an integrated curriculum in a holistic paradigm. The study continued until the participant finished her student teaching in the same classroom. The data included exchange journals, videotapes, field notes, audiotapes, oral interviews, documents, memos, and photographs. K. S. Goodman's five pillars of whole language and Cambourne's eight optimal conditions for learning were used as frameworks for the data analysis. The results of the analysis were presented in chronological and analytical descriptions. The chronological description portrayed the stages of the participant's growth in whole language during the block semester and her attempts to translate theory into use during student teaching. The analytical description elaborated the results of the data analysis within the two whole language frameworks. The results of this study emphasize the importance of immersion in whole language in order to develop in whole language, the value of the transactional paradigm in teaching and learning, and the power of a community of learners.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Language and Literature.; Education, Teacher Training.; Education, Social Sciences.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goodman, Kenneth S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWhole language in preservice teacher education: The story of Mechelleen_US
dc.creatorYokota, Reikoen_US
dc.contributor.authorYokota, Reikoen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative case study examines the influence of a whole language methods course on a preservice teacher's ideas and student teaching performance. In addition it explores significant problems the participant had when she attempted to apply theory in practice and the influence of block instructors, classroom teachers, primary school students, and block classmates on the participant's development in whole language. The study took place during the participant's whole language block semester at the University of Arizona in Tucson, in which preservice teachers learned teaching methods in language arts, reading, and social studies through both classroom sessions and a practicum, at Borton Primary Magnet School, whose principal was a well-known proponent of whole language education. The participant's apprenticeship classroom teacher utilized an integrated curriculum in a holistic paradigm. The study continued until the participant finished her student teaching in the same classroom. The data included exchange journals, videotapes, field notes, audiotapes, oral interviews, documents, memos, and photographs. K. S. Goodman's five pillars of whole language and Cambourne's eight optimal conditions for learning were used as frameworks for the data analysis. The results of the analysis were presented in chronological and analytical descriptions. The chronological description portrayed the stages of the participant's growth in whole language during the block semester and her attempts to translate theory into use during student teaching. The analytical description elaborated the results of the data analysis within the two whole language frameworks. The results of this study emphasize the importance of immersion in whole language in order to develop in whole language, the value of the transactional paradigm in teaching and learning, and the power of a community of learners.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Social Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Kenneth S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9923141en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39470660en_US
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