Exploring the use of video and computer technology in the classroom

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282862
Title:
Exploring the use of video and computer technology in the classroom
Author:
Webster, Daniel Frank
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study, conducted in a large southwestern U.S. city during the spring semester, 1997, explored an environment in which students in an engineering and technology magnet middle school were to work with video and computers to produce a series of products. The initial purpose of this exploratory-descriptive study was to look for literacy events relating to learning about these technologies. This study's population included the teacher, her classroom aide, the school's principal, and approximately 21 students. Students, who were to develop individual 10-step video production projects, achieved a mean of 4.55, a median of 4, and a mode of 3 based on step completed. only one student finished the project. Expecting each student to produce an individual project appeared to restrict the discourse necessary for students to learn the literacies of video and computers. Other mitigating influences involved materials and equipment, teacher health, and outside influences (e.g., a death in the family and university course work). Future studies should consider: (1) a classroom in which a strong collaborative/cooperative group relationship is established among the students and/or; (2) an approach examining several video production classes each day for an entire semester.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Technology of.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.; Cinema.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Valmont, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExploring the use of video and computer technology in the classroomen_US
dc.creatorWebster, Daniel Franken_US
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Daniel Franken_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study, conducted in a large southwestern U.S. city during the spring semester, 1997, explored an environment in which students in an engineering and technology magnet middle school were to work with video and computers to produce a series of products. The initial purpose of this exploratory-descriptive study was to look for literacy events relating to learning about these technologies. This study's population included the teacher, her classroom aide, the school's principal, and approximately 21 students. Students, who were to develop individual 10-step video production projects, achieved a mean of 4.55, a median of 4, and a mode of 3 based on step completed. only one student finished the project. Expecting each student to produce an individual project appeared to restrict the discourse necessary for students to learn the literacies of video and computers. Other mitigating influences involved materials and equipment, teacher health, and outside influences (e.g., a death in the family and university course work). Future studies should consider: (1) a classroom in which a strong collaborative/cooperative group relationship is established among the students and/or; (2) an approach examining several video production classes each day for an entire semester.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
dc.subjectCinema.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorValmont, William J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9923172en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39471779en_US
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