A study of the reading process in Chinese through detecting errors in a meaningful text

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282855
Title:
A study of the reading process in Chinese through detecting errors in a meaningful text
Author:
Xu, Jingguo
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Goodman Reading Model differs from the word recognition model on the issues of (a) whether reading depends on perception of every single word; (b) whether prediction is used in the reading process; and (c) whether reading comprehension depends on individual words. The study tested the validity of the two models by investigating the reading process in Chinese through error detection. Two hundred subjects with equal numbers of college and middle school students participated in the experiment. The subjects at each educational level were randomly divided into error and meaning focus groups. The error focus groups were instructed to search for errors embedded in a Chinese text and the meaning focus groups to read for meaning of the same text within limited time. Then they were asked to recall the errors detected and the contents of the story in writing and to answer a questionnaire. After that they were given unlimited time to search for as many errors as they could. The main results showed that (a) all subjects failed to detect half of the errors under limited exposure and all errors under unlimited exposure; (b) the error focus subjects detected significantly more errors than the meaning focus subjects under limited exposure, but the meaning focus subjects scored significantly higher than the error focus subjects in recall of the story; (c) there was no significant difference between reading times in the number of errors detected but in the scores for the recall of the story; (d) the college subjects performed significantly better than the middle school subjects in error detection and reading comprehension; (e) more errors were detected in the contents word category than in the function word category; and (f) some extralinguistic factors had effects on the task performance. The results suggest (a) that characters and/or words are not recognized in a linear process in reading; (b) prediction is used under the influence of knowledge of various kinds; and (c) reading comprehension employs words but does not depend on individual words. The Goodman Reading Model is validated and proved applicable to reading in Chinese.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Linguistics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goodman, Kenneth S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA study of the reading process in Chinese through detecting errors in a meaningful texten_US
dc.creatorXu, Jingguoen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Jingguoen_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Goodman Reading Model differs from the word recognition model on the issues of (a) whether reading depends on perception of every single word; (b) whether prediction is used in the reading process; and (c) whether reading comprehension depends on individual words. The study tested the validity of the two models by investigating the reading process in Chinese through error detection. Two hundred subjects with equal numbers of college and middle school students participated in the experiment. The subjects at each educational level were randomly divided into error and meaning focus groups. The error focus groups were instructed to search for errors embedded in a Chinese text and the meaning focus groups to read for meaning of the same text within limited time. Then they were asked to recall the errors detected and the contents of the story in writing and to answer a questionnaire. After that they were given unlimited time to search for as many errors as they could. The main results showed that (a) all subjects failed to detect half of the errors under limited exposure and all errors under unlimited exposure; (b) the error focus subjects detected significantly more errors than the meaning focus subjects under limited exposure, but the meaning focus subjects scored significantly higher than the error focus subjects in recall of the story; (c) there was no significant difference between reading times in the number of errors detected but in the scores for the recall of the story; (d) the college subjects performed significantly better than the middle school subjects in error detection and reading comprehension; (e) more errors were detected in the contents word category than in the function word category; and (f) some extralinguistic factors had effects on the task performance. The results suggest (a) that characters and/or words are not recognized in a linear process in reading; (b) prediction is used under the influence of knowledge of various kinds; and (c) reading comprehension employs words but does not depend on individual words. The Goodman Reading Model is validated and proved applicable to reading in Chinese.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Kenneth S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9914330en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39124691en_US
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