Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282853
Title:
American Indian warriors today
Author:
MorningStorm, J. Boyd, 1947-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The American Indian concept of warriorhood is a direct reflection of their warrior ancestors. Today, many Native American celebrations and ceremonies pay homage to their warrior/veterans. Many of these ceremonies are to cleanse the veteran of the trauma of combat. This is not a new phenomenon. Native celebrations and ceremonies are a direct link to the culture, religion and ancient conception of warriorhood among American Indian nations today. In social gatherings like the American Indian Pow Wow, Native people have always honored their warriors. The only difference is that in these modern times these warriors will be called veterans. Ways of honoring these warrior/veterans may vary from nation (tribe) to nation or region to region, but the tradition of honoring ceremonies has been handed down through the centuries in social gatherings like the American Indian Pow Wow. The conception of the warrior is basically unchanged since the old days of native societies to these modern times of life on an Indian Reservation. The Indian warrior has always been a protector of his people. This warrior conception is explained in depth in the introduction. The Native concept of the warrior today is only a reflection of what that same conception was hundreds of years ago, even longer in many respects. What this means is a warrior was looked upon as a protector. The old Indian warrior codes of honor of those by gone days are now replaced by the U.S. Military code of honor. This concept fits well with the warrior/veterans of today. Because in truth, Indians have become Americans over the past one hundred years. After all is said and done, The American Indian's willingness to fight for this country is also a reflection of his ancestors' willingness to fight for this land. In the last analysis American Indians have always fought for this land.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Anthropology, Cultural.; Literature, American.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Holm, Tom

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAmerican Indian warriors todayen_US
dc.creatorMorningStorm, J. Boyd, 1947-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMorningStorm, J. Boyd, 1947-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe American Indian concept of warriorhood is a direct reflection of their warrior ancestors. Today, many Native American celebrations and ceremonies pay homage to their warrior/veterans. Many of these ceremonies are to cleanse the veteran of the trauma of combat. This is not a new phenomenon. Native celebrations and ceremonies are a direct link to the culture, religion and ancient conception of warriorhood among American Indian nations today. In social gatherings like the American Indian Pow Wow, Native people have always honored their warriors. The only difference is that in these modern times these warriors will be called veterans. Ways of honoring these warrior/veterans may vary from nation (tribe) to nation or region to region, but the tradition of honoring ceremonies has been handed down through the centuries in social gatherings like the American Indian Pow Wow. The conception of the warrior is basically unchanged since the old days of native societies to these modern times of life on an Indian Reservation. The Indian warrior has always been a protector of his people. This warrior conception is explained in depth in the introduction. The Native concept of the warrior today is only a reflection of what that same conception was hundreds of years ago, even longer in many respects. What this means is a warrior was looked upon as a protector. The old Indian warrior codes of honor of those by gone days are now replaced by the U.S. Military code of honor. This concept fits well with the warrior/veterans of today. Because in truth, Indians have become Americans over the past one hundred years. After all is said and done, The American Indian's willingness to fight for this country is also a reflection of his ancestors' willingness to fight for this land. In the last analysis American Indians have always fought for this land.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, American.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural and Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHolm, Tomen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9912162en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39125233en_US
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