Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282842
Title:
The balance model: Neuropsychological treatment of dyslexia
Author:
Goldstein, Bram Harold, 1969-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined whether an intervention program based on a neuropsychological approach to specific reading disability subtypes would improve overall reading ability, Subjects were middle school righthanded boys and girls who were low achieving readers. The readers were initially subtyped according to Bakker's clinical-inferential approach used with clinic children and classified as L-type dyslexic (substantive errors and excessively fast reading), P-type dyslexic (slow and laborious reading), or M-type dyslexic (a combination of both L-type and P-type dyslexia). The method of assessment was used as a pre-posttest group design. The dependent variables included a reading decoding measure, oral reading errors, and comprehension scores from the Multilevel Academic Skills Inventory (MASI), which is a reading and language battery. All three groups were receiving additional reading instruction from their school reading program. Experimental treatment occurred in two parts: Hemispheric Specific Stimulation (HSS) and Hemispheric Alluding Stimuli (HAS). When the study was concluded, a fused dichotic listening task was administered once to discern a potential relationship between the subtypes of the groups and their particular hemispheric processing capacity for language. The results revealed that the neuropsychological treatment was effective at improving reading comprehension and accuracy. Although there were perceived benefits in comprehension, no direct comprehension exercises were used in this study so the gains could have been attributed to the school reading program. There were no changes in word recognition between the pretest and the posttest. The results from the fused dichotic words task were not significant.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Secondary.; Education, Reading.; Psychology, Physiological.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Obrzut, John E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe balance model: Neuropsychological treatment of dyslexiaen_US
dc.creatorGoldstein, Bram Harold, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Bram Harold, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined whether an intervention program based on a neuropsychological approach to specific reading disability subtypes would improve overall reading ability, Subjects were middle school righthanded boys and girls who were low achieving readers. The readers were initially subtyped according to Bakker's clinical-inferential approach used with clinic children and classified as L-type dyslexic (substantive errors and excessively fast reading), P-type dyslexic (slow and laborious reading), or M-type dyslexic (a combination of both L-type and P-type dyslexia). The method of assessment was used as a pre-posttest group design. The dependent variables included a reading decoding measure, oral reading errors, and comprehension scores from the Multilevel Academic Skills Inventory (MASI), which is a reading and language battery. All three groups were receiving additional reading instruction from their school reading program. Experimental treatment occurred in two parts: Hemispheric Specific Stimulation (HSS) and Hemispheric Alluding Stimuli (HAS). When the study was concluded, a fused dichotic listening task was administered once to discern a potential relationship between the subtypes of the groups and their particular hemispheric processing capacity for language. The results revealed that the neuropsychological treatment was effective at improving reading comprehension and accuracy. Although there were perceived benefits in comprehension, no direct comprehension exercises were used in this study so the gains could have been attributed to the school reading program. There were no changes in word recognition between the pretest and the posttest. The results from the fused dichotic words task were not significant.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Reading.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Physiological.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorObrzut, John E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9912150en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39124800en_US
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