Managing a romantic partner's identity in a conflict situation: Social cognitive ability and the definition of the situation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282837
Title:
Managing a romantic partner's identity in a conflict situation: Social cognitive ability and the definition of the situation
Author:
Weger, Harry, Walter, 1963-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this dissertation is to give a constructivist account of conflict message production in romantic relationships. Two main claims are advanced. First, the degree to which partners confirm each other's identity in conflict situations results from their definition of the situation. Second, those with more sophisticated systems for construing others have more integrated and more usable situational definitions. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis reveled main effects for cognitive complexity and perceived resistance in predicting the level of identity confirmation in complaint messages. Interactions between cognitive complexity and perceived resistance, perceived dominance, perceived severity, and attributional tendency were also significantly associated with complaint message quality. Consistent with the claim that more sophisticated social cognitions have more integrated situational definitions, those with higher levels of social cognitive development were influenced by their perception of their power in the relationship, the severity of the partner's transgression, and the degree to which they tend to attribute a partner's dissatisfying behaviors to negative intentions, while only the perception of resistance predicted the identity confirming quality of the less cognitively complex participants' messages.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Speech Communication.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jacobs, Scott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleManaging a romantic partner's identity in a conflict situation: Social cognitive ability and the definition of the situationen_US
dc.creatorWeger, Harry, Walter, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWeger, Harry, Walter, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation is to give a constructivist account of conflict message production in romantic relationships. Two main claims are advanced. First, the degree to which partners confirm each other's identity in conflict situations results from their definition of the situation. Second, those with more sophisticated systems for construing others have more integrated and more usable situational definitions. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis reveled main effects for cognitive complexity and perceived resistance in predicting the level of identity confirmation in complaint messages. Interactions between cognitive complexity and perceived resistance, perceived dominance, perceived severity, and attributional tendency were also significantly associated with complaint message quality. Consistent with the claim that more sophisticated social cognitions have more integrated situational definitions, those with higher levels of social cognitive development were influenced by their perception of their power in the relationship, the severity of the partner's transgression, and the degree to which they tend to attribute a partner's dissatisfying behaviors to negative intentions, while only the perception of resistance predicted the identity confirming quality of the less cognitively complex participants' messages.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, Scotten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9912143en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39124605en_US
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