The role of conflict-based communication patterns in male physical aggression toward female partners

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282790
Title:
The role of conflict-based communication patterns in male physical aggression toward female partners
Author:
Feldman, Clyde Myles
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the association between twenty conflict-based, communication patterns and the level of occurrence (categorical variable) and frequency (continuous variable) of male physical aggression towards female partners. Participants were 280 male volunteers drawn from a community preventative health clinic (n = 236) and from a domestic violence monitoring program for misdemeanor domestic violence offenses (n = 44). Males reported on nine verbally aggressive, five avoidance/withdraw, and six problem-solving/cooperation communication patterns for both self and partner. The communication patterns included mutual verbal aggression, unilateral verbal aggression, threaten/back down, blame/defend, pressure/resist, mutual avoidance, unilateral avoidance, demand/withdraw, mutual problem-solving, unilateral problem-solving, and net constructive communication (i.e., mutual problem-solving minus mutual verbal aggression). Four groups were formed based upon the occurrence of physically aggressive acts during the last twelve months: (a) completely nonviolent, (b) nonviolent toward partner but violent toward others, (c) 1-5 instances of violence toward partner, and (d) 6 or more instances of violence toward partner. Relationship distress was also examined as a moderator and as distress-nonviolence contrasted with violence. Primary findings were that 19 of 20 communication patterns were significantly associated with low and/or high frequency of physical aggression in comparison to nonviolence. Verbally aggressive patterns contributed most (33%), problem-solving/cooperation patterns contributed the second most (27%), and avoidance/withdraw patterns contributing the least (13%) to explaining differences in the level of occurrence of physical aggression. The seven strongest communication patterns indicated that physically aggressive relationships had more mutual verbal aggression, more male and female unilateral aggression, more male threaten/partner back down, less net constructive communication, less mutual problem-solving, and more male demand/partner withdraw than their nonviolent counterparts. Relationship distress was not found to moderate the relationships between any of the twenty communication patterns and physical aggression. Furthermore, only five patterns were found to be more characteristic of physically aggressive relationships than distressed, nonviolent relationships (the above seven patterns excluding problem-solving and demand/withdraw); the other fifteen were equally characteristic of either physical aggression or distress-nonviolence.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ridley, Carl A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe role of conflict-based communication patterns in male physical aggression toward female partnersen_US
dc.creatorFeldman, Clyde Mylesen_US
dc.contributor.authorFeldman, Clyde Mylesen_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe primary purpose of this study was to investigate the association between twenty conflict-based, communication patterns and the level of occurrence (categorical variable) and frequency (continuous variable) of male physical aggression towards female partners. Participants were 280 male volunteers drawn from a community preventative health clinic (n = 236) and from a domestic violence monitoring program for misdemeanor domestic violence offenses (n = 44). Males reported on nine verbally aggressive, five avoidance/withdraw, and six problem-solving/cooperation communication patterns for both self and partner. The communication patterns included mutual verbal aggression, unilateral verbal aggression, threaten/back down, blame/defend, pressure/resist, mutual avoidance, unilateral avoidance, demand/withdraw, mutual problem-solving, unilateral problem-solving, and net constructive communication (i.e., mutual problem-solving minus mutual verbal aggression). Four groups were formed based upon the occurrence of physically aggressive acts during the last twelve months: (a) completely nonviolent, (b) nonviolent toward partner but violent toward others, (c) 1-5 instances of violence toward partner, and (d) 6 or more instances of violence toward partner. Relationship distress was also examined as a moderator and as distress-nonviolence contrasted with violence. Primary findings were that 19 of 20 communication patterns were significantly associated with low and/or high frequency of physical aggression in comparison to nonviolence. Verbally aggressive patterns contributed most (33%), problem-solving/cooperation patterns contributed the second most (27%), and avoidance/withdraw patterns contributing the least (13%) to explaining differences in the level of occurrence of physical aggression. The seven strongest communication patterns indicated that physically aggressive relationships had more mutual verbal aggression, more male and female unilateral aggression, more male threaten/partner back down, less net constructive communication, less mutual problem-solving, and more male demand/partner withdraw than their nonviolent counterparts. Relationship distress was not found to moderate the relationships between any of the twenty communication patterns and physical aggression. Furthermore, only five patterns were found to be more characteristic of physically aggressive relationships than distressed, nonviolent relationships (the above seven patterns excluding problem-solving and demand/withdraw); the other fifteen were equally characteristic of either physical aggression or distress-nonviolence.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRidley, Carl A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9912093en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39122530en_US
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