Infants' reasoning about physical entities: Insights from their tracking of objects and collections

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282771
Title:
Infants' reasoning about physical entities: Insights from their tracking of objects and collections
Author:
Jiang, Wenqi
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this project was to investigate 8-month-old infants' representation and tracking of objects in occlusion events. Recent research has shown that young infants are able to reason about various aspects of physical objects' behavior. This project further explores this ability and delineates some limits to it. Specifically, the first set of studies (1A-1F) investigated whether infants' apply spatiotemporal continuity to collections of objects as they do to single objects. Because to adults a collection can be viewed as multiple objects as well as a non-object individual, infants' tracking of a collection may thus inform us not only about their representation of objects but also about their representation of non-object entities. The second set of studies (2A and 2B) focused on infants' detection of spatiotemporal discontinuity in object behavior in different situations: The disappearance versus appearance situation. These two sets of studies revealed two limitations in infants' application of spatiotemporal continuity: While 8-month-old infants are able to detect the discontinuous disappearance of single objects, they (a) do not readily detect the discontinuous disappearance of a collection but succeed only in certain circumstances, and (b) do not detect the discontinuous appearance of single objects. These limitations have important implications for infants' knowledge of and tracking systems for objects. Finally, some general issues arising from the current project are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wynn, Karen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInfants' reasoning about physical entities: Insights from their tracking of objects and collectionsen_US
dc.creatorJiang, Wenqien_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Wenqien_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this project was to investigate 8-month-old infants' representation and tracking of objects in occlusion events. Recent research has shown that young infants are able to reason about various aspects of physical objects' behavior. This project further explores this ability and delineates some limits to it. Specifically, the first set of studies (1A-1F) investigated whether infants' apply spatiotemporal continuity to collections of objects as they do to single objects. Because to adults a collection can be viewed as multiple objects as well as a non-object individual, infants' tracking of a collection may thus inform us not only about their representation of objects but also about their representation of non-object entities. The second set of studies (2A and 2B) focused on infants' detection of spatiotemporal discontinuity in object behavior in different situations: The disappearance versus appearance situation. These two sets of studies revealed two limitations in infants' application of spatiotemporal continuity: While 8-month-old infants are able to detect the discontinuous disappearance of single objects, they (a) do not readily detect the discontinuous disappearance of a collection but succeed only in certain circumstances, and (b) do not detect the discontinuous appearance of single objects. These limitations have important implications for infants' knowledge of and tracking systems for objects. Finally, some general issues arising from the current project are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWynn, Karenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9912068en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39106871en_US
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