Analysis of the N⁺₂ first negative band system in the Earth's upper atmosphere dayglow

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282770
Title:
Analysis of the N⁺₂ first negative band system in the Earth's upper atmosphere dayglow
Author:
Stone, Thomas Coleman, 1958-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The First Negative (1N) band emission of the molecular nitrogen ion, N⁺₂ , is one of the most prominent features of the terrestrial dayglow spectrum. However, past N⁺₂ studies have encountered problems in validating the intensity of this emission. Also, some anomalous characteristics of the dayglow 1N spectrum remain unexplained, such as a highly developed rotational and vibrational structure. These anomalies appear to be due to the charge exchange reaction: O⁺ + N₂ → N⁺₂ + O, which dominates N⁺₂ ion production at high altitudes. This thesis examines dayglow 1N spectra acquired by the Arizona Airglow Experiment (GLO) flown on the space shuttle mission STS-74. In the analysis the emission is separated into two components. First is the emission from ions produced by photoionization and electron bombardment. Second is emission from ions produced by the charge exchange reaction, which cannot be modeled. The first source is evaluated and subtracted from the observed spectrum. The remaining emission is then used to derive empirical parameters related to the charge exchange reaction. These parameters can be used to estimate the 1N emission rate expected from the thermosphere, based on model atmosphere predictions. This emission rate can be used to determine the dayside O⁺ concentration using the GLO observations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Atmospheric Science.; Physics, Molecular.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Stmospheric Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Krider, E. Philip

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of the N⁺₂ first negative band system in the Earth's upper atmosphere dayglowen_US
dc.creatorStone, Thomas Coleman, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorStone, Thomas Coleman, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe First Negative (1N) band emission of the molecular nitrogen ion, N⁺₂ , is one of the most prominent features of the terrestrial dayglow spectrum. However, past N⁺₂ studies have encountered problems in validating the intensity of this emission. Also, some anomalous characteristics of the dayglow 1N spectrum remain unexplained, such as a highly developed rotational and vibrational structure. These anomalies appear to be due to the charge exchange reaction: O⁺ + N₂ → N⁺₂ + O, which dominates N⁺₂ ion production at high altitudes. This thesis examines dayglow 1N spectra acquired by the Arizona Airglow Experiment (GLO) flown on the space shuttle mission STS-74. In the analysis the emission is separated into two components. First is the emission from ions produced by photoionization and electron bombardment. Second is emission from ions produced by the charge exchange reaction, which cannot be modeled. The first source is evaluated and subtracted from the observed spectrum. The remaining emission is then used to derive empirical parameters related to the charge exchange reaction. These parameters can be used to estimate the 1N emission rate expected from the thermosphere, based on model atmosphere predictions. This emission rate can be used to determine the dayside O⁺ concentration using the GLO observations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Atmospheric Science.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Molecular.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineStmospheric Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKrider, E. Philipen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9912067en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3910686xen_US
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