Kinematics and star formation properties of low surface brightness galaxies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282756
Title:
Kinematics and star formation properties of low surface brightness galaxies
Author:
Pickering, Timothy Edward, 1970-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
We present detailed studies of the kinematics and star formation properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. A total of five giant LSB galaxies including the prototype, Malin 1, were imaged in the 21-cm line of H sc I to provide the first glimpse into the kinematics of these systems. We find that these are some of the first examples to be uncovered of galaxies that are both massive and dark matter dominated. We also find that most of the galaxies have gas surface densities that lie below the critical density for star formation at all radii, consistent with their lack of star formation. In a couple of cases, though, the gas exceeds the critical density where there is no star formation implying a higher gas velocity dispersion or strong flaring of the gas disk. Long-slit optical spectroscopy and broadband CCD imaging are presented for a total of 71 LSB galaxies. We find that these galaxies follow a Fisher-Tully relation with a slope that is in good agreement with the slopes found for other samples of LSB and HSB galaxies. We interpret both the optical and H sc I rotation curves in terms of mass models consisting of a halo only or a stellar component plus a halo of either an isothermal form or an NFW halo of the form described by Navarro et al. (1996) and find that the rotation curves are generally best modeled by low mass-to-light ratio stellar components. By modeling the rotation curves with only an NFW halo and comparing the results with the predictions of cosmological simulations we find that these data are marginally consistent at best with Standard Cold Dark Matter and generally favor lower density models. However, we also find that when including the stellar component, the NFW halo gives a significantly worse fit than an isothermal halo in many cases. This suggests that the inner parts of galactic halos may not be well described by the NFW halo profile.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Astronomy and Astrophysics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Astronomy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Impey, Christopher D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleKinematics and star formation properties of low surface brightness galaxiesen_US
dc.creatorPickering, Timothy Edward, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPickering, Timothy Edward, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe present detailed studies of the kinematics and star formation properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. A total of five giant LSB galaxies including the prototype, Malin 1, were imaged in the 21-cm line of H sc I to provide the first glimpse into the kinematics of these systems. We find that these are some of the first examples to be uncovered of galaxies that are both massive and dark matter dominated. We also find that most of the galaxies have gas surface densities that lie below the critical density for star formation at all radii, consistent with their lack of star formation. In a couple of cases, though, the gas exceeds the critical density where there is no star formation implying a higher gas velocity dispersion or strong flaring of the gas disk. Long-slit optical spectroscopy and broadband CCD imaging are presented for a total of 71 LSB galaxies. We find that these galaxies follow a Fisher-Tully relation with a slope that is in good agreement with the slopes found for other samples of LSB and HSB galaxies. We interpret both the optical and H sc I rotation curves in terms of mass models consisting of a halo only or a stellar component plus a halo of either an isothermal form or an NFW halo of the form described by Navarro et al. (1996) and find that the rotation curves are generally best modeled by low mass-to-light ratio stellar components. By modeling the rotation curves with only an NFW halo and comparing the results with the predictions of cosmological simulations we find that these data are marginally consistent at best with Standard Cold Dark Matter and generally favor lower density models. However, we also find that when including the stellar component, the NFW halo gives a significantly worse fit than an isothermal halo in many cases. This suggests that the inner parts of galactic halos may not be well described by the NFW halo profile.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Astronomy and Astrophysics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAstronomyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorImpey, Christopher D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9906532en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38874465en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.