Content construction: How content becomes curriculum in secondary science classrooms

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282735
Title:
Content construction: How content becomes curriculum in secondary science classrooms
Author:
Slaughter, Jeanne Marie, 1968-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the factors that influence two secondary teachers' planning and teaching when incorporating newly acquired genetics content into their existing curriculum. Data included transcriptions of six audio taped interviews, field notes from two summer content courses and eight classroom observations, classroom documents such as work sheets, and content and pedagogical diagrams completed prior to and immediately following the two summer content courses. Data were analyzed and used to construct three cases: the case of content, the case of Natalie, and the case of June. The cases were combined for additional analysis. The cross case analysis aided in the identification of influential factors and the development of a model of secondary school curriculum influences. Factors found to influence teachers as they incorporate new content into their teaching can be divided into internal and external factors. Internal factors include: the teachers' past experiences with science, personal content knowledge, confidence, and beliefs about science, learning and science teaching. External factors include: students' abilities, time constraints, and physical classroom limitations. The findings suggest that the teachers' previous content knowledge and beliefs have the greatest impact in determining the new content a teacher will incorporate into her existing curriculum.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Secondary.; Education, Sciences.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Teaching and Teacher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Doyle, Walter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleContent construction: How content becomes curriculum in secondary science classroomsen_US
dc.creatorSlaughter, Jeanne Marie, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSlaughter, Jeanne Marie, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the factors that influence two secondary teachers' planning and teaching when incorporating newly acquired genetics content into their existing curriculum. Data included transcriptions of six audio taped interviews, field notes from two summer content courses and eight classroom observations, classroom documents such as work sheets, and content and pedagogical diagrams completed prior to and immediately following the two summer content courses. Data were analyzed and used to construct three cases: the case of content, the case of Natalie, and the case of June. The cases were combined for additional analysis. The cross case analysis aided in the identification of influential factors and the development of a model of secondary school curriculum influences. Factors found to influence teachers as they incorporate new content into their teaching can be divided into internal and external factors. Internal factors include: the teachers' past experiences with science, personal content knowledge, confidence, and beliefs about science, learning and science teaching. External factors include: students' abilities, time constraints, and physical classroom limitations. The findings suggest that the teachers' previous content knowledge and beliefs have the greatest impact in determining the new content a teacher will incorporate into her existing curriculum.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9901763en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38785341en_US
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