Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282732
Title:
Sexual coercion: Evolutionary approaches and peer group contexts
Author:
Cleveland, Hobart Harrington
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined evolutionary and peer context theories of sexual coercion. Using a longitudinal design it followed university men across the 1997-98 academic year, collecting data from subjects in both the Fall and Spring semesters. Data collected during the Fall data collection addressed two competing evolutionary explanations of sexual coercion: mate deprivation and short-term mating effort. Data collected during the Spring addressed the role of peer contexts in influencing sexual coercion. Evolutionary findings were not consistent with the mate deprivation explanation of sexual coercion. Instead, findings supported the short-term mating strategy explanation of sexual coercion. Longitudinal analysis found that university men's level of short-term mating strategy as measured in the Fall predicted both pro-coercion peer contexts and partner coercion as measured in the Spring. Structural equations models of the interrelationships between time 1 short-term mating strategy, time 2 peer contexts, and time 2 partner coercion were fit to the data. The fit of these models underscored the importance of controlling for selection into peer contexts when examining the relationships between peer contexts and individuals' sexually coercive behavior. The discussion focuses on (1) considering trait-based explanations of sexual coercion and (2) the relevance of short-term mating strategy to the formation of young male peer groups.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rowe, David C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSexual coercion: Evolutionary approaches and peer group contextsen_US
dc.creatorCleveland, Hobart Harringtonen_US
dc.contributor.authorCleveland, Hobart Harringtonen_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined evolutionary and peer context theories of sexual coercion. Using a longitudinal design it followed university men across the 1997-98 academic year, collecting data from subjects in both the Fall and Spring semesters. Data collected during the Fall data collection addressed two competing evolutionary explanations of sexual coercion: mate deprivation and short-term mating effort. Data collected during the Spring addressed the role of peer contexts in influencing sexual coercion. Evolutionary findings were not consistent with the mate deprivation explanation of sexual coercion. Instead, findings supported the short-term mating strategy explanation of sexual coercion. Longitudinal analysis found that university men's level of short-term mating strategy as measured in the Fall predicted both pro-coercion peer contexts and partner coercion as measured in the Spring. Structural equations models of the interrelationships between time 1 short-term mating strategy, time 2 peer contexts, and time 2 partner coercion were fit to the data. The fit of these models underscored the importance of controlling for selection into peer contexts when examining the relationships between peer contexts and individuals' sexually coercive behavior. The discussion focuses on (1) considering trait-based explanations of sexual coercion and (2) the relevance of short-term mating strategy to the formation of young male peer groups.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRowe, David C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9901716en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38837948en_US
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