MIXED LAND USES, EXTERNALITIES, AND RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY VALUES: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF THE MUNICIPAL ZONING ORDINANCE OF TUCSON, ARIZONA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282703
Title:
MIXED LAND USES, EXTERNALITIES, AND RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY VALUES: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF THE MUNICIPAL ZONING ORDINANCE OF TUCSON, ARIZONA
Author:
Cao, Than Van
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is primarily concerned with a number of theoretical and empirical problems in the economics of land-use control. Chapter 1 sets the stage for the review of the economic literature on zoning and neighborhood externalities. This chapter concludes that there are important research issues which need to be studied, viz. the recognition of the multi-nucleated character of the contemporary urban areas, and the need to take account of both the advantages and disadvantages of proximity of single-family homes to nonresidential activities. Since economic research so far has failed to establish conclusively that neighborhood externalities affect adversely or advantageously the market value of residential properties, Chapter 2 shall discuss household behavior when confronting neighborhood externalities, with special reference to land-use externalities. The discussion suggests, among other things, that the existence of nonsingle-family land uses in a neighborhood does not necessarily tend to depress the price of single-family homes. Chapter 3 provides a data base for the research. Then, in Chapter 4 the hypothesized relationship between neighborhood externalities and residential property value is tested econometrically using aggregate data for 52 neighborhoods in the City of Tucson. The results of the estimations indicate that the value of a single-family home depends, among other things, on its physical characteristics, its accessibility to employment and shopping, and local public services. For the first time, there is statistical evidence that over the ranges studied in this research nonsingle-family land uses exert a positive influence on residential property value. These results suggest that the time has come to redirect future research or policy efforts toward viewing mixed land uses possibly as a beneficial contribution to contemporary urban development. That is, zoning ordinances could legitimately move away from a "separate facilities" philosophy to a "mixed land use" philosophy without lowering property values. Issues of accessibility and restrictions in the availability of energy resources could have much to do with the lessening importance of conventional belief in separatory land planning doctrines.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Real property -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Zoning law -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Land use -- Planning -- Arizona.; City planning -- Arizona -- Tucson
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Economics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cory, Dennis C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMIXED LAND USES, EXTERNALITIES, AND RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY VALUES: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF THE MUNICIPAL ZONING ORDINANCE OF TUCSON, ARIZONAen_US
dc.creatorCao, Than Vanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCao, Than Vanen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is primarily concerned with a number of theoretical and empirical problems in the economics of land-use control. Chapter 1 sets the stage for the review of the economic literature on zoning and neighborhood externalities. This chapter concludes that there are important research issues which need to be studied, viz. the recognition of the multi-nucleated character of the contemporary urban areas, and the need to take account of both the advantages and disadvantages of proximity of single-family homes to nonresidential activities. Since economic research so far has failed to establish conclusively that neighborhood externalities affect adversely or advantageously the market value of residential properties, Chapter 2 shall discuss household behavior when confronting neighborhood externalities, with special reference to land-use externalities. The discussion suggests, among other things, that the existence of nonsingle-family land uses in a neighborhood does not necessarily tend to depress the price of single-family homes. Chapter 3 provides a data base for the research. Then, in Chapter 4 the hypothesized relationship between neighborhood externalities and residential property value is tested econometrically using aggregate data for 52 neighborhoods in the City of Tucson. The results of the estimations indicate that the value of a single-family home depends, among other things, on its physical characteristics, its accessibility to employment and shopping, and local public services. For the first time, there is statistical evidence that over the ranges studied in this research nonsingle-family land uses exert a positive influence on residential property value. These results suggest that the time has come to redirect future research or policy efforts toward viewing mixed land uses possibly as a beneficial contribution to contemporary urban development. That is, zoning ordinances could legitimately move away from a "separate facilities" philosophy to a "mixed land use" philosophy without lowering property values. Issues of accessibility and restrictions in the availability of energy resources could have much to do with the lessening importance of conventional belief in separatory land planning doctrines.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectReal property -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subjectZoning law -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subjectLand use -- Planning -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectCity planning -- Arizona -- Tucsonen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCory, Dennis C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8100302en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7940429en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b23469006en_US
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