Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282691
Title:
INFRARED INTERFEROMETRIC SYSTEMS
Author:
Kwon, Osuk Y.
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Infrared interferometric systems using a CO₂ laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 μm have been investigated. The purpose of infrared interferometry is to test (1) optical components required for high energy laser systems such as infrared transmitting materials and diamond-turned metal mirrors, (2) unpolished rough surface optics during the early stages of fabrication, and (3) deep aspherics and other optics of nonconventional surface figures. The physical principles behind longer wavelength interferometry are as follows. First, the specular component of scattered light increases with increasing wavelength for randomly rough surfaces. Second, the aspheric departure from the best fit reference sphere (in units of probing wavelength) is reduced. This reduced sensitivity gives us a manageable number of fringes in the interferogram of deep aspherics. Specific systems developed in this work are the infrared laser unequal path interferometer (IRLUPI), the IRLUPI with infrared computer generated hologram (IRCGH), the infrared common path interferometers such as the infrared point diffraction interferometer (IRPDI), and the infrared scatterplate interferometer (IRSPI). The above interferometers produce interferograms of equal optical path difference (OPD). Other types of common path interferometers which provide interferograms of differential OPD (or slope) are also developed. They are the infrared lateral shearing interferometers (IRLSI); a germanium plane parallel plate, the Ronchi ruling, and the double grating lateral shearing interferometer. A pyroelectric vidicon (PEV) has been employed as an AC infrared detector with proper intensity modulation techniques. Chopping, panning, and phase variation of the interferogram modulate the interference pattern effectively for various types of interferometers. Germanium and zinc selenide optics are used for lenses and beamsplitters. A He-Ne gas laser is installed parallel to the CO₂ beam for the ease of initial alignment. Many test interferograms are shown using each interferometer. The statistical analysis and experimental verification of the relationship between fringe contrast and rms surface roughness enabled us to have noncontact measurement of surface roughness interferometrically. This result was used for a series of tests for the unpolished large diameter off-axis parabolic mirror during the preliminary fabrication stage. Some interesting topics are included for future investigation to fulfill the growing demand for versatility in interferometry.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Laser interferometers.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wyant, James C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleINFRARED INTERFEROMETRIC SYSTEMSen_US
dc.creatorKwon, Osuk Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Osuk Y.en_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInfrared interferometric systems using a CO₂ laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 μm have been investigated. The purpose of infrared interferometry is to test (1) optical components required for high energy laser systems such as infrared transmitting materials and diamond-turned metal mirrors, (2) unpolished rough surface optics during the early stages of fabrication, and (3) deep aspherics and other optics of nonconventional surface figures. The physical principles behind longer wavelength interferometry are as follows. First, the specular component of scattered light increases with increasing wavelength for randomly rough surfaces. Second, the aspheric departure from the best fit reference sphere (in units of probing wavelength) is reduced. This reduced sensitivity gives us a manageable number of fringes in the interferogram of deep aspherics. Specific systems developed in this work are the infrared laser unequal path interferometer (IRLUPI), the IRLUPI with infrared computer generated hologram (IRCGH), the infrared common path interferometers such as the infrared point diffraction interferometer (IRPDI), and the infrared scatterplate interferometer (IRSPI). The above interferometers produce interferograms of equal optical path difference (OPD). Other types of common path interferometers which provide interferograms of differential OPD (or slope) are also developed. They are the infrared lateral shearing interferometers (IRLSI); a germanium plane parallel plate, the Ronchi ruling, and the double grating lateral shearing interferometer. A pyroelectric vidicon (PEV) has been employed as an AC infrared detector with proper intensity modulation techniques. Chopping, panning, and phase variation of the interferogram modulate the interference pattern effectively for various types of interferometers. Germanium and zinc selenide optics are used for lenses and beamsplitters. A He-Ne gas laser is installed parallel to the CO₂ beam for the ease of initial alignment. Many test interferograms are shown using each interferometer. The statistical analysis and experimental verification of the relationship between fringe contrast and rms surface roughness enabled us to have noncontact measurement of surface roughness interferometrically. This result was used for a series of tests for the unpolished large diameter off-axis parabolic mirror during the preliminary fabrication stage. Some interesting topics are included for future investigation to fulfill the growing demand for versatility in interferometry.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLaser interferometers.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWyant, James C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8017755en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7617967en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13469435en_US
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