All the right moves: Recognizing (in)visible gestures in academic publishing

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282684
Title:
All the right moves: Recognizing (in)visible gestures in academic publishing
Author:
McNabb, Richard Ronald
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Having worked on a major rhetoric and composition journal, I have found that in order to authorize an argument through publication, one has to make all the right moves. This notion of making all the right moves is what I refer to as gesturing. Gesturing is a critical tactic that "shifts interpretive authority out of the context of everyday human and social activity (our professional practices) and into a timeless, independent, already constituted and structured realm of subjects, works, ideas, and linguistic patterns" (Epstein 65). Scholars who desire to contribute to composition's marketplace of ideas must therefore deny their local epistemology, that is, the material sites of their activities that ground their professional practices: the classroom, department hallways, universities. Instead, they must gesture to an already established set of rules to authorize their argument. Based on Michel Foucault's theory of discourse, gesturing becomes a method for controlling the production of knowledge. Using Foucault as a framework, I illustrate how scholarly journals function as a means of restricting the discursive resources available to create new knowledge. Although Foucault would never assign agency to individuals, I argue that editors and peer referees formalize the gestures required of a writer. They restrict our discursive resources by maintaining the conditions under which discourse may be employed. The purpose of my project, therefore, is to consider how these gestures function as a discursive convention within rhetoric and composition studies. Although recent research has begun to look at and critique the publishing system, no one has addressed or challenged the boundaries of our discursive conventions that authorize editors' and peer referees' practices in the selection and dissemination of knowledge. My project fills this gap by (1) mapping the perimeters of our discourse, and (2) exploring what gestures might persuade reviewers and editors to recognize what and who authorizes their reviews, reviews that otherwise interpreted as standard scholarly criteria used in adjudicating an essay's merits.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Rhetoric and Composition.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enos, Theresa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAll the right moves: Recognizing (in)visible gestures in academic publishingen_US
dc.creatorMcNabb, Richard Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.authorMcNabb, Richard Ronalden_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHaving worked on a major rhetoric and composition journal, I have found that in order to authorize an argument through publication, one has to make all the right moves. This notion of making all the right moves is what I refer to as gesturing. Gesturing is a critical tactic that "shifts interpretive authority out of the context of everyday human and social activity (our professional practices) and into a timeless, independent, already constituted and structured realm of subjects, works, ideas, and linguistic patterns" (Epstein 65). Scholars who desire to contribute to composition's marketplace of ideas must therefore deny their local epistemology, that is, the material sites of their activities that ground their professional practices: the classroom, department hallways, universities. Instead, they must gesture to an already established set of rules to authorize their argument. Based on Michel Foucault's theory of discourse, gesturing becomes a method for controlling the production of knowledge. Using Foucault as a framework, I illustrate how scholarly journals function as a means of restricting the discursive resources available to create new knowledge. Although Foucault would never assign agency to individuals, I argue that editors and peer referees formalize the gestures required of a writer. They restrict our discursive resources by maintaining the conditions under which discourse may be employed. The purpose of my project, therefore, is to consider how these gestures function as a discursive convention within rhetoric and composition studies. Although recent research has begun to look at and critique the publishing system, no one has addressed or challenged the boundaries of our discursive conventions that authorize editors' and peer referees' practices in the selection and dissemination of knowledge. My project fills this gap by (1) mapping the perimeters of our discourse, and (2) exploring what gestures might persuade reviewers and editors to recognize what and who authorizes their reviews, reviews that otherwise interpreted as standard scholarly criteria used in adjudicating an essay's merits.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Rhetoric and Composition.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831928en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38555359en_US
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