Pathways of adolescent college graduation expectations: Individual and maternal predictors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282677
Title:
Pathways of adolescent college graduation expectations: Individual and maternal predictors
Author:
Linver, Miriam Rosanne, 1970-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study examined college graduation expectations of adolescents and young adults. A model to predict college graduation expectations of 10th grade students was developed based on Eccles' (1983) expectancy-value model. Both individual predictors (gender, school grades, self-concept of ability) and maternal predictors (maternal education; parental divorce; maternal standards, expectations, and encouragement; adolescents' perceptions of maternal advice and involvement) were included. A separate model was developed to describe and predict pathways of college graduation expectations over time, at 10th grade, at 12th grade, and at age 21. Individual predictors (early adolescent expectations, gender, school grades, self-concept of ability) and maternal predictors (maternal education, parental divorce) were examined. Data from seven waves (6th grade through age 21) of the Michigan Study of Adolescent Life Transitions (MSALT) were utilized. For the prediction of 10th grade expectations, 1352 adolescents and 784 mothers participated in at least one wave; for the prediction of expectation pathways, 868 adolescents provided data. A structural equation modeling (SEM) technique was used for the prediction of 10th grade expectations; a hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) technique was used for the prediction of pathways of expectations. The results of the SEM analyses suggested that self-concept of ability was positively related to 10th grade college graduation expectations, school grades were negatively related to expectations, and males tended to have higher expectations than girls when all variables in the model were taken into account. Maternal standards, expectations, and encouragement as well as adolescents' perceptions of maternal advice and support were positively related to expectations. The results of the HLM analyses suggested that in general, adolescents have stable pathways of college graduation expectations as they enter young adulthood. Gender, 7th grade college expectations, school grades, self-concept of ability, and maternal education level were associated with intercepts (10th grade) of college graduation expectations. The relation of gender to expectation slopes approached significance. Boys' slopes were more positive than girls' slopes. The importance of examining interindividual differences in intraindividual change is discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Women's Studies.; Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barber, Bonnie L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePathways of adolescent college graduation expectations: Individual and maternal predictorsen_US
dc.creatorLinver, Miriam Rosanne, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLinver, Miriam Rosanne, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined college graduation expectations of adolescents and young adults. A model to predict college graduation expectations of 10th grade students was developed based on Eccles' (1983) expectancy-value model. Both individual predictors (gender, school grades, self-concept of ability) and maternal predictors (maternal education; parental divorce; maternal standards, expectations, and encouragement; adolescents' perceptions of maternal advice and involvement) were included. A separate model was developed to describe and predict pathways of college graduation expectations over time, at 10th grade, at 12th grade, and at age 21. Individual predictors (early adolescent expectations, gender, school grades, self-concept of ability) and maternal predictors (maternal education, parental divorce) were examined. Data from seven waves (6th grade through age 21) of the Michigan Study of Adolescent Life Transitions (MSALT) were utilized. For the prediction of 10th grade expectations, 1352 adolescents and 784 mothers participated in at least one wave; for the prediction of expectation pathways, 868 adolescents provided data. A structural equation modeling (SEM) technique was used for the prediction of 10th grade expectations; a hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) technique was used for the prediction of pathways of expectations. The results of the SEM analyses suggested that self-concept of ability was positively related to 10th grade college graduation expectations, school grades were negatively related to expectations, and males tended to have higher expectations than girls when all variables in the model were taken into account. Maternal standards, expectations, and encouragement as well as adolescents' perceptions of maternal advice and support were positively related to expectations. The results of the HLM analyses suggested that in general, adolescents have stable pathways of college graduation expectations as they enter young adulthood. Gender, 7th grade college expectations, school grades, self-concept of ability, and maternal education level were associated with intercepts (10th grade) of college graduation expectations. The relation of gender to expectation slopes approached significance. Boys' slopes were more positive than girls' slopes. The importance of examining interindividual differences in intraindividual change is discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarber, Bonnie L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831854en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38650083en_US
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