Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282674
Title:
Successful behaviors in information systems development teams
Author:
Glynn, Melissa Sue, 1969-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation research examines the impact of leadership, cohesion, and information sharing, and the application of group support systems on information design systems (ISD) project quality and project team satisfaction. Research has identified that after 40 years of developing information systems, there are still widespread difficulties in delivering systems on time and on budget. The research objective of this study is to examine the group level processes to understand how ISD team behavior can impact quality issues. A group support system was introduced to act as a sensemaking treatment to increase team performance. The following research questions were identified: (1) What is the impact of cohesion on project quality? (2) What is the impact of leadership on project quality? (3) What is the impact of information sharing on project quality? (4) What is the impact of cohesion on team satisfaction? (5) What is the impact of leadership on team satisfaction? (6) What is the impact of information sharing on team satisfaction? (7) Is there a relationship between group support systems use and project quality? (8) Can group support systems enable sensemaking activities? A longitudinal experiment was conducted with subjects who were enrolled in four sections of an upper-division Management Information Systems course in Systems Analysis and Design in consecutive semesters. Lectures and class-activities were identical in all four sections except that group support systems technology (GSS) was used by the second-semester classes, the treatment group. Student teams in all sections completed a semester-long ISD project.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Management.; Information Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Information Resources and Library Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hurzt, C. D.; Weishand, Suzanne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSuccessful behaviors in information systems development teamsen_US
dc.creatorGlynn, Melissa Sue, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGlynn, Melissa Sue, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation research examines the impact of leadership, cohesion, and information sharing, and the application of group support systems on information design systems (ISD) project quality and project team satisfaction. Research has identified that after 40 years of developing information systems, there are still widespread difficulties in delivering systems on time and on budget. The research objective of this study is to examine the group level processes to understand how ISD team behavior can impact quality issues. A group support system was introduced to act as a sensemaking treatment to increase team performance. The following research questions were identified: (1) What is the impact of cohesion on project quality? (2) What is the impact of leadership on project quality? (3) What is the impact of information sharing on project quality? (4) What is the impact of cohesion on team satisfaction? (5) What is the impact of leadership on team satisfaction? (6) What is the impact of information sharing on team satisfaction? (7) Is there a relationship between group support systems use and project quality? (8) Can group support systems enable sensemaking activities? A longitudinal experiment was conducted with subjects who were enrolled in four sections of an upper-division Management Information Systems course in Systems Analysis and Design in consecutive semesters. Lectures and class-activities were identical in all four sections except that group support systems technology (GSS) was used by the second-semester classes, the treatment group. Student teams in all sections completed a semester-long ISD project.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectInformation Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInformation Resources and Library Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHurzt, C. D.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorWeishand, Suzanneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831850en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38646882en_US
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