Design considerations in manufacturing composite conductors: An exposition of Percolation Theory

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282664
Title:
Design considerations in manufacturing composite conductors: An exposition of Percolation Theory
Author:
Gillis, Gregory Nelson, 1965-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is an exposition of Percolation Theory, directed to the audience of beginning undergraduate mathematics students, though this can include gifted high school students. The vehicle by which the theory is taught is that of problem solving. The reader of the dissertation is invited into a web of mathematical exploration and inquiry by attempting to solve the real real-world problem of designing composite conductors. By making real composite conductors, carrying out various experiments, using computers to do data collecting, and using calculators for subsequent data analysis the reader can participate in the creation of mathematics, the development of mathematical techniques, and in the discovery of new and unexpected connections. The mathematics of Percolation Theory are in this way constructed with the reader. The necessity and importance of this work are many-fold. It is the first such treatise on Percolation Theory that makes the theory accessible to a larger audience than mathematics graduate or senior college students. It will be of interest to high school and beginning college students who desire to know in what real-world contexts some of the mathematics they know can be put. This work will be of interest to educators for the hands-on way in which it reinforces the student's current mathematical ability, while enriching the student's understanding of problem solving, mathematical modeling, use of technology, and probability.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Mathematics.; Mathematics.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Mathematics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gay, David A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDesign considerations in manufacturing composite conductors: An exposition of Percolation Theoryen_US
dc.creatorGillis, Gregory Nelson, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGillis, Gregory Nelson, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is an exposition of Percolation Theory, directed to the audience of beginning undergraduate mathematics students, though this can include gifted high school students. The vehicle by which the theory is taught is that of problem solving. The reader of the dissertation is invited into a web of mathematical exploration and inquiry by attempting to solve the real real-world problem of designing composite conductors. By making real composite conductors, carrying out various experiments, using computers to do data collecting, and using calculators for subsequent data analysis the reader can participate in the creation of mathematics, the development of mathematical techniques, and in the discovery of new and unexpected connections. The mathematics of Percolation Theory are in this way constructed with the reader. The necessity and importance of this work are many-fold. It is the first such treatise on Percolation Theory that makes the theory accessible to a larger audience than mathematics graduate or senior college students. It will be of interest to high school and beginning college students who desire to know in what real-world contexts some of the mathematics they know can be put. This work will be of interest to educators for the hands-on way in which it reinforces the student's current mathematical ability, while enriching the student's understanding of problem solving, mathematical modeling, use of technology, and probability.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Mathematics.en_US
dc.subjectMathematics.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMathematicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGay, David A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831837en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38637145en_US
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