Who governs in a binational context? The role of transnational political elites

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282655
Title:
Who governs in a binational context? The role of transnational political elites
Author:
Coronado, Irasema, 1959-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The United States-Mexico border region is characterized as interdependent. Research has shown that the political boundary complicates rather than facilitates communication and dialogue in border communities that are struggling to ameliorate environmental, economic, immigration, and drug trafficking problems. Likewise, the federal governments in Mexico City and Washington, D.C., in their attempts to maintain sovereignty and centralize power, mandate unilateral solutions to border problems that in some cases exacerbate them. Nevertheless, in spite of federal policies, local elites who reside in the border region, informally create solutions and linkages that help to address local concerns. Additionally, the border regions are unlike their respective nation's center of power, culturally, socially and politically. The U.S.-Mexico border region has been described as a "third country" by some scholars. The present study of border politics sought to determine the unique characteristics of border politicians, binational elites, who wield political power on both sides of the border. This study was conducted to qualitatively explore the binational linkages that political elites shared. The identification of binational elites would, in turn, shed light on how politicians in the future, and in other parts of the world, can function and understand the complexity of problems in a binational setting.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Political Science, General.; Political Science, International Law and Relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, Edward J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWho governs in a binational context? The role of transnational political elitesen_US
dc.creatorCoronado, Irasema, 1959-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCoronado, Irasema, 1959-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe United States-Mexico border region is characterized as interdependent. Research has shown that the political boundary complicates rather than facilitates communication and dialogue in border communities that are struggling to ameliorate environmental, economic, immigration, and drug trafficking problems. Likewise, the federal governments in Mexico City and Washington, D.C., in their attempts to maintain sovereignty and centralize power, mandate unilateral solutions to border problems that in some cases exacerbate them. Nevertheless, in spite of federal policies, local elites who reside in the border region, informally create solutions and linkages that help to address local concerns. Additionally, the border regions are unlike their respective nation's center of power, culturally, socially and politically. The U.S.-Mexico border region has been described as a "third country" by some scholars. The present study of border politics sought to determine the unique characteristics of border politicians, binational elites, who wield political power on both sides of the border. This study was conducted to qualitatively explore the binational linkages that political elites shared. The identification of binational elites would, in turn, shed light on how politicians in the future, and in other parts of the world, can function and understand the complexity of problems in a binational setting.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Edward J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831825en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38634132en_US
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