Forensic anthropology as science: Is there a difference between academic and applied uses of biological anthropology?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282649
Title:
Forensic anthropology as science: Is there a difference between academic and applied uses of biological anthropology?
Author:
Anderson, Bruce Edward
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The central issued explored by this research is whether forensic anthropology can be characterized as being fundamentally different from academically-oriented biological anthropology. My view--and thesis statement--is that they are not two fundamentally-differing pursuits. While I recognize that important differences do exist between these fields, I argue that the differences are not sufficient to draw a stark line between academically-oriented biological anthropology and its medico-legal application. The principal source of data marshaled in support of this view is my dozen-plus years experience as a student. then practitioner, of forensic anthropology. One hundred forensic anthropology case reports of mine are utilized to illustrate an example of the product that forensic anthropologists routinely supply to medico-legal and governmental agencies. However, more important than this product are the processes behind the issuance of such reports. I argue that while the product may be different--a necessity because the intended audience certainly is--the conscientious forensic anthropologist employs the same analytical processes as when engaged in academic pursuits. Thus, it is my position that forensic anthropologists remain biological anthropologists while performing medico-legal services.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Physical.; Health Sciences, General.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Birkby, Walter H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleForensic anthropology as science: Is there a difference between academic and applied uses of biological anthropology?en_US
dc.creatorAnderson, Bruce Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Bruce Edwarden_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe central issued explored by this research is whether forensic anthropology can be characterized as being fundamentally different from academically-oriented biological anthropology. My view--and thesis statement--is that they are not two fundamentally-differing pursuits. While I recognize that important differences do exist between these fields, I argue that the differences are not sufficient to draw a stark line between academically-oriented biological anthropology and its medico-legal application. The principal source of data marshaled in support of this view is my dozen-plus years experience as a student. then practitioner, of forensic anthropology. One hundred forensic anthropology case reports of mine are utilized to illustrate an example of the product that forensic anthropologists routinely supply to medico-legal and governmental agencies. However, more important than this product are the processes behind the issuance of such reports. I argue that while the product may be different--a necessity because the intended audience certainly is--the conscientious forensic anthropologist employs the same analytical processes as when engaged in academic pursuits. Thus, it is my position that forensic anthropologists remain biological anthropologists while performing medico-legal services.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Physical.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, General.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBirkby, Walter H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9829597en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3855253xen_US
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