Minority student persistence in college: A longitudinal, qualitative study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282646
Title:
Minority student persistence in college: A longitudinal, qualitative study
Author:
Tucker, Debra L., 1966-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine minority student college persistence. The research setting was a public, Research I institution located in the Southwest. A longitudinal, qualitative research approach was used in which twenty-five students were interviewed at the beginning of their freshmen year, and again, approximately seven years later. Through the analysis of the minority students' experience, a theory of minority student persistence was developed called the Theory of Navigation. The results indicate that minority students experience college differently than their white students cohort. Traditional theories of student persistence do not fully explain their experience. The findings of this research could affect how colleges nationwide serve their minority student populations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Guidance and Counseling.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Education administration andHigher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Slaughter, Sheila A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMinority student persistence in college: A longitudinal, qualitative studyen_US
dc.creatorTucker, Debra L., 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Debra L., 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine minority student college persistence. The research setting was a public, Research I institution located in the Southwest. A longitudinal, qualitative research approach was used in which twenty-five students were interviewed at the beginning of their freshmen year, and again, approximately seven years later. Through the analysis of the minority students' experience, a theory of minority student persistence was developed called the Theory of Navigation. The results indicate that minority students experience college differently than their white students cohort. Traditional theories of student persistence do not fully explain their experience. The findings of this research could affect how colleges nationwide serve their minority student populations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Guidance and Counseling.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducation administration andHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSlaughter, Sheila A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9829595en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38550763en_US
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