Attachment to parents as mediator and/or moderator of psychosocial functioning among young adults with alcoholic fathers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282626
Title:
Attachment to parents as mediator and/or moderator of psychosocial functioning among young adults with alcoholic fathers
Author:
Bice Broussard, Deborah, 1956-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Relations between current paternal drinking status, attachment to parents, and psychosocial functioning were examined to determine whether previously reported findings on children of alcoholics were replicated, and to evaluate perceived attachment to parents as a mediator and/or moderator of adult children's adjustment. One hundred thirty-eight college students under age 23, 66% female, 80% White, 49% with alcoholic fathers and all with non-problem-drinking mothers, completed self-report measures of parental drinking status, security of attachment to parents, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, adult attachment style, alcohol involvement, and drug use. Most subjects scored in normal ranges for anxiety and depression, were moderate drinkers, and reported little drug use. Subjects with alcoholic fathers reported lower self-esteem and less-secure attachment to father; they also more frequently reported that their father's parenting style was inconsistent, and less frequently reported that it was responsive. With psychosocial functioning variables hierarchically regressed on demographics, paternal drinking status, attachment to father, and attachment to mother, paternal alcoholism added to prediction of only self-esteem, attachment to father improved prediction of secure adult attachment style rating, and attachment to mother added to prediction of mental health, self-esteem, adult attachment, and alcohol use. In separate tests of statistical mediation, results are consistent with the role of attachment to father as a mediator of the relation between paternal alcoholism and both mental health and security of adult attachment style, and with attachment to mother as a mediator of the relation between paternal alcoholism and mental health, self-esteem, and adult attachment. Neither security of attachment to father nor to mother was a linear moderator of statistical relations between paternal alcoholism and psychosocial adjustment; thus results did not support a buffering hypothesis. Findings warrant caution against assumption of psychopathology in alcoholics' children; most function within normal ranges on multiple measures. Knowledge of paternal alcoholism is, alone, a poor predictor of psychosocial adjustment; knowledge of the child's perception of parent-child relationships, particularly attachment to mother, appears to have relatively greater predictive utility. Future research should include replication with a population not limited to college students.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Shoham, Varda

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAttachment to parents as mediator and/or moderator of psychosocial functioning among young adults with alcoholic fathersen_US
dc.creatorBice Broussard, Deborah, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBice Broussard, Deborah, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRelations between current paternal drinking status, attachment to parents, and psychosocial functioning were examined to determine whether previously reported findings on children of alcoholics were replicated, and to evaluate perceived attachment to parents as a mediator and/or moderator of adult children's adjustment. One hundred thirty-eight college students under age 23, 66% female, 80% White, 49% with alcoholic fathers and all with non-problem-drinking mothers, completed self-report measures of parental drinking status, security of attachment to parents, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, adult attachment style, alcohol involvement, and drug use. Most subjects scored in normal ranges for anxiety and depression, were moderate drinkers, and reported little drug use. Subjects with alcoholic fathers reported lower self-esteem and less-secure attachment to father; they also more frequently reported that their father's parenting style was inconsistent, and less frequently reported that it was responsive. With psychosocial functioning variables hierarchically regressed on demographics, paternal drinking status, attachment to father, and attachment to mother, paternal alcoholism added to prediction of only self-esteem, attachment to father improved prediction of secure adult attachment style rating, and attachment to mother added to prediction of mental health, self-esteem, adult attachment, and alcohol use. In separate tests of statistical mediation, results are consistent with the role of attachment to father as a mediator of the relation between paternal alcoholism and both mental health and security of adult attachment style, and with attachment to mother as a mediator of the relation between paternal alcoholism and mental health, self-esteem, and adult attachment. Neither security of attachment to father nor to mother was a linear moderator of statistical relations between paternal alcoholism and psychosocial adjustment; thus results did not support a buffering hypothesis. Findings warrant caution against assumption of psychopathology in alcoholics' children; most function within normal ranges on multiple measures. Knowledge of paternal alcoholism is, alone, a poor predictor of psychosocial adjustment; knowledge of the child's perception of parent-child relationships, particularly attachment to mother, appears to have relatively greater predictive utility. Future research should include replication with a population not limited to college students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShoham, Vardaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9829364en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38554148en_US
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