BIOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL FACTORS INVOLVED IN ENSILING CELLULOSIC CROP WASTES FOLLOWED BY REHYDRATION WITH WHEY

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282592
Title:
BIOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL FACTORS INVOLVED IN ENSILING CELLULOSIC CROP WASTES FOLLOWED BY REHYDRATION WITH WHEY
Author:
Bain, Joanne Carol
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Six different cotton gin trash silages were studied which varied according to the rehydrating medium (water or whey) and the strain of L. plantarum, if any, used for inoculation. Silages were incubated at 34°C and analyzed at weeks 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 for counts of lactobacilli, total anaerobes, and sporeforming anaerobes. Biochemical measurements included pH, proximate analysis, volatile fatty acid analysis, and lactic acid analysis. Counts of lactobacilli and total anaerobes followed similar trends in all experimental silages with numbers greatly increasing by the end of week one and then subsequently declining. Counts of sporeforming anaerobes increased ten-fold by the end of the second week. Subsequent counts showed that the water-rehydrated silages maintained this increase whereas the whey silages decreased in numbers to their original magnitude. Whey-rehydrated silages had a significantly lower pH, higher dry matter content, a lower level of fiber, lignin, and cellulose, and a higher concentration of carbohydrate. These silages showed only traces of butyric acid and significantly higher concentrations of lactic acid. Thus the whey, as a rehydrating medium, produced silages of desirable pH and exhibited biochemical parameters indicative of good quality and feeding value. Of the three water-rehydrated silages, one was of obvious poor quality with the other two being questionable. No benefit was seen in using an inoculum of L. plantarum.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cotton -- Silage.; Whey.; Silage -- Composition.; Silage -- Fermentation.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural Biochemistry and Nutrition
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stull, J. Warren

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBIOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL FACTORS INVOLVED IN ENSILING CELLULOSIC CROP WASTES FOLLOWED BY REHYDRATION WITH WHEYen_US
dc.creatorBain, Joanne Carolen_US
dc.contributor.authorBain, Joanne Carolen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSix different cotton gin trash silages were studied which varied according to the rehydrating medium (water or whey) and the strain of L. plantarum, if any, used for inoculation. Silages were incubated at 34°C and analyzed at weeks 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 for counts of lactobacilli, total anaerobes, and sporeforming anaerobes. Biochemical measurements included pH, proximate analysis, volatile fatty acid analysis, and lactic acid analysis. Counts of lactobacilli and total anaerobes followed similar trends in all experimental silages with numbers greatly increasing by the end of week one and then subsequently declining. Counts of sporeforming anaerobes increased ten-fold by the end of the second week. Subsequent counts showed that the water-rehydrated silages maintained this increase whereas the whey silages decreased in numbers to their original magnitude. Whey-rehydrated silages had a significantly lower pH, higher dry matter content, a lower level of fiber, lignin, and cellulose, and a higher concentration of carbohydrate. These silages showed only traces of butyric acid and significantly higher concentrations of lactic acid. Thus the whey, as a rehydrating medium, produced silages of desirable pH and exhibited biochemical parameters indicative of good quality and feeding value. Of the three water-rehydrated silages, one was of obvious poor quality with the other two being questionable. No benefit was seen in using an inoculum of L. plantarum.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Silage.en_US
dc.subjectWhey.en_US
dc.subjectSilage -- Composition.en_US
dc.subjectSilage -- Fermentation.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Biochemistry and Nutritionen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStull, J. Warrenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8027753en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8679921en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13902799en_US
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