Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282589
Title:
Help-seeking and quality of life in women with breast cancer
Author:
Chiang, Hui-Ling, 1969-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine direct and interactive relationships of stimuli and adaptive modes on help-seeking and quality of life. Stimuli were external (social network characteristics, social support need) and internal (age, symptom, symptom severity, satisfaction with social support). Adaptive modes were physiologic function, self-concept (enabling skill, mastery), role function (socioeconomic status, self-care), and interdependence (trust in health care provider, dyadic adjustment). The conceptual framework was based on Roy's Adaptation Model. Data were secondary analyzed using stepwise multiple regression to test the research hypothesis. The sample consisted of 102 married/cohabitating women with breast cancer. Thirteen instruments measured the variables. Factor analysis constructed indices for variables having multiple measures. Social support need had a direct effect on help-seeking. Number in the network interacted with education on help-seeking. Number of symptoms interacted with mastery on help-seeking. Self-care had a direct effect on quality of life. Satisfaction with social support, number of symptoms, and number in the network interacted with self-care on quality of life. Age interacted with self-care and trust in health care provider on quality of life. Severity of symptom interacted with mastery on quality of life. Social support need, the interaction between number in the network and education, and the interaction between number of symptoms and mastery significantly contributed to help-seeking. The interaction between satisfaction with social support and self-care significantly contributed to quality of life. Based on multiple interactive effects of stimuli and adaptive modes relative to help-seeking and quality of life rather than separate direct effects, Roy's Adaptation Model may better specify interactive relationships of stimuli and adaptive modes than simple direct relationships. To promote women's help-seeking, nurses should assess the number in women's social networks and women's level of education, be aware of women's level of social support need, recognize women's symptoms, and enhance women's sense of mastery. To promote women's quality of life, nurses should assist women toward improved perception of social support, which should increase their level of satisfaction with social support, and encourage performance of self-care activities.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Mental Health.; Health Sciences, Nursing.; Health Sciences, Oncology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
May, Kathleen M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHelp-seeking and quality of life in women with breast canceren_US
dc.creatorChiang, Hui-Ling, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorChiang, Hui-Ling, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine direct and interactive relationships of stimuli and adaptive modes on help-seeking and quality of life. Stimuli were external (social network characteristics, social support need) and internal (age, symptom, symptom severity, satisfaction with social support). Adaptive modes were physiologic function, self-concept (enabling skill, mastery), role function (socioeconomic status, self-care), and interdependence (trust in health care provider, dyadic adjustment). The conceptual framework was based on Roy's Adaptation Model. Data were secondary analyzed using stepwise multiple regression to test the research hypothesis. The sample consisted of 102 married/cohabitating women with breast cancer. Thirteen instruments measured the variables. Factor analysis constructed indices for variables having multiple measures. Social support need had a direct effect on help-seeking. Number in the network interacted with education on help-seeking. Number of symptoms interacted with mastery on help-seeking. Self-care had a direct effect on quality of life. Satisfaction with social support, number of symptoms, and number in the network interacted with self-care on quality of life. Age interacted with self-care and trust in health care provider on quality of life. Severity of symptom interacted with mastery on quality of life. Social support need, the interaction between number in the network and education, and the interaction between number of symptoms and mastery significantly contributed to help-seeking. The interaction between satisfaction with social support and self-care significantly contributed to quality of life. Based on multiple interactive effects of stimuli and adaptive modes relative to help-seeking and quality of life rather than separate direct effects, Roy's Adaptation Model may better specify interactive relationships of stimuli and adaptive modes than simple direct relationships. To promote women's help-seeking, nurses should assess the number in women's social networks and women's level of education, be aware of women's level of social support need, recognize women's symptoms, and enhance women's sense of mastery. To promote women's quality of life, nurses should assist women toward improved perception of social support, which should increase their level of satisfaction with social support, and encourage performance of self-care activities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Mental Health.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Oncology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMay, Kathleen M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9829315en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38551408en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.