NAFTA, globalization, and higher education departments of business administration: Case studies from northwestern Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282587
Title:
NAFTA, globalization, and higher education departments of business administration: Case studies from northwestern Mexico
Author:
Acosta Fuller, Jose Blas, 1956-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One of the major developments marking the global economy is the emergence of regional trading blocks. This study takes into account this trend and it addresses a question about business administration departments in Mexican universities: To what extent and in what ways do they reflect the influence of NAFTA and globalization on their curriculum, structure, and mission? Conceptually, the study draws on dependency theory and institutional theory. Dependency theory was useful for understanding globalization in Mexican business administration as affected through business and linkages to the U.S. Institutional theory was useful in understanding and explaining specific mechanisms experienced by the departments as they relate to the different professional organizations in society. This study considered four departments located in large public and private universities in Northwestern Mexico. Documents and interviews were the two principal sources of data. This investigation involved the analysis of 46 documents, and 26 interviews conducted with administrators and faculty in Business Administration programs. The analysis of data indicated that private departments hold national and international relationships that influence curriculum change while the public departments are more nationally oriented in relationships and curriculum change.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Administration.; Political Science, International Law and Relations.; Education, Business.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Study of Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNAFTA, globalization, and higher education departments of business administration: Case studies from northwestern Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorAcosta Fuller, Jose Blas, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAcosta Fuller, Jose Blas, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne of the major developments marking the global economy is the emergence of regional trading blocks. This study takes into account this trend and it addresses a question about business administration departments in Mexican universities: To what extent and in what ways do they reflect the influence of NAFTA and globalization on their curriculum, structure, and mission? Conceptually, the study draws on dependency theory and institutional theory. Dependency theory was useful for understanding globalization in Mexican business administration as affected through business and linkages to the U.S. Institutional theory was useful in understanding and explaining specific mechanisms experienced by the departments as they relate to the different professional organizations in society. This study considered four departments located in large public and private universities in Northwestern Mexico. Documents and interviews were the two principal sources of data. This investigation involved the analysis of 46 documents, and 26 interviews conducted with administrators and faculty in Business Administration programs. The analysis of data indicated that private departments hold national and international relationships that influence curriculum change while the public departments are more nationally oriented in relationships and curriculum change.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Business.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineStudy of Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9829313en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38550775en_US
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