Characterization of α₂-adrenergic receptor localization and functional responses

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282583
Title:
Characterization of α₂-adrenergic receptor localization and functional responses
Author:
Richman, Jeremy Golding, 1970-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The three α₂-adrenergic receptors (α₂-ARs) were studied in both recombinant and endogenous systems. It was my general hypothesis that the three α₂-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes exhibit differential tissue and subcellular localization and couple to physiological pathways to directly elicit functional responses. It was our hope, that in identifying differences between the α₂-ARs we may elucidate their physiological roles and provide a potential means for the rational development of therapeutic drugs or models of such pathologies as atherosclerosis, hypertension and glaucoma. Subtype selective antibodies have been generated and these have provided a tool with which to study the receptors on a molecular and cellular level. Utilizing a number of biochemical, pharmacological, molecular and cellular techniques, I have identified differences between the three receptors with respect to the tissues in which they are expressed, the subcellular domains in which they localize and their patterns of sequestration and down-regulation. In addition, I have demonstrated the expression and co-localization of the α₂-ARs in a variety of native tissues, and a number of functional responses these receptors mediate. These functional responses may have ramifications relevant to tissue healing mechanisms as well as may play a role in a number of pathologies.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Molecular.; Health Sciences, Pharmacology.; Biology, Animal Physiology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Pharmacology and Toxicology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Regan, John W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCharacterization of α₂-adrenergic receptor localization and functional responsesen_US
dc.creatorRichman, Jeremy Golding, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRichman, Jeremy Golding, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe three α₂-adrenergic receptors (α₂-ARs) were studied in both recombinant and endogenous systems. It was my general hypothesis that the three α₂-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes exhibit differential tissue and subcellular localization and couple to physiological pathways to directly elicit functional responses. It was our hope, that in identifying differences between the α₂-ARs we may elucidate their physiological roles and provide a potential means for the rational development of therapeutic drugs or models of such pathologies as atherosclerosis, hypertension and glaucoma. Subtype selective antibodies have been generated and these have provided a tool with which to study the receptors on a molecular and cellular level. Utilizing a number of biochemical, pharmacological, molecular and cellular techniques, I have identified differences between the three receptors with respect to the tissues in which they are expressed, the subcellular domains in which they localize and their patterns of sequestration and down-regulation. In addition, I have demonstrated the expression and co-localization of the α₂-ARs in a variety of native tissues, and a number of functional responses these receptors mediate. These functional responses may have ramifications relevant to tissue healing mechanisms as well as may play a role in a number of pathologies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Molecular.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Pharmacology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Animal Physiology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmacology and Toxicologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRegan, John W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9817361en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38269880en_US
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