Factors associated with a high level of functioning in cocaine users

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282567
Title:
Factors associated with a high level of functioning in cocaine users
Author:
Reid, Charlles Robert
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study used qualitative methods to investigate factors associated with a high level of functioning in people who use cocaine. Ten subjects, seven women and three men, were interviewed. Each subject was referred to the study by a person who thought the subject functioned at a high level. The subjects also completed the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) (McLellan et al., 1992) assessment and evaluation instrument. The factors identified by the subjects were similar to those found by Ditton et al. (1991), that is, people who use cocaine can be middle class, with all the social and economic problems of the general population and also share the same values as the general population. However this study expanded on the findings of Ditton et al. and added the area of awareness of drawbacks of cocaine use. Factors that the subjects associated with a high level of functioning were identified. The use of non-captive populations to study cocaine use was explored. Implications of the study and recommendations for future research in this field are presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy.; Psychology, Behavioral.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education and Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sales, Amos P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFactors associated with a high level of functioning in cocaine usersen_US
dc.creatorReid, Charlles Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorReid, Charlles Roberten_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study used qualitative methods to investigate factors associated with a high level of functioning in people who use cocaine. Ten subjects, seven women and three men, were interviewed. Each subject was referred to the study by a person who thought the subject functioned at a high level. The subjects also completed the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) (McLellan et al., 1992) assessment and evaluation instrument. The factors identified by the subjects were similar to those found by Ditton et al. (1991), that is, people who use cocaine can be middle class, with all the social and economic problems of the general population and also share the same values as the general population. However this study expanded on the findings of Ditton et al. and added the area of awareness of drawbacks of cocaine use. Factors that the subjects associated with a high level of functioning were identified. The use of non-captive populations to study cocaine use was explored. Implications of the study and recommendations for future research in this field are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSales, Amos P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9817343en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38268917en_US
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