Persuading clients to engage in treatment: The effect of using one-sided and two-sided information on the likelihood of treatment attendance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282553
Title:
Persuading clients to engage in treatment: The effect of using one-sided and two-sided information on the likelihood of treatment attendance
Author:
Becker, Susan Elizabeth, 1961-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two studies were conducted to examine the role that information plays on persuading participants to engage in psychotherapy. Study 1 examined the effect of commitment to treatment on the seeking of information about the treatment by psychotherapy clients. This study demonstrated that participants have a preference for seeking positive information about treatment, particularly those who are postdecisional about change. Study 2 presented undergraduate participants with either positive information (one-sided) or combined positive and negative information (two-sided) about treatment. An interaction effect was found such that participants who were contemplating change were more likely to attend treatment after hearing two-sided information than one-sided. Participants who were ready to take action were more likely to attend when they heard one-sided information than when they heard two-sided information. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the presentation of information in psychotherapy informed consent procedures.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Shoham, Varda

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePersuading clients to engage in treatment: The effect of using one-sided and two-sided information on the likelihood of treatment attendanceen_US
dc.creatorBecker, Susan Elizabeth, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Susan Elizabeth, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo studies were conducted to examine the role that information plays on persuading participants to engage in psychotherapy. Study 1 examined the effect of commitment to treatment on the seeking of information about the treatment by psychotherapy clients. This study demonstrated that participants have a preference for seeking positive information about treatment, particularly those who are postdecisional about change. Study 2 presented undergraduate participants with either positive information (one-sided) or combined positive and negative information (two-sided) about treatment. An interaction effect was found such that participants who were contemplating change were more likely to attend treatment after hearing two-sided information than one-sided. Participants who were ready to take action were more likely to attend when they heard one-sided information than when they heard two-sided information. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the presentation of information in psychotherapy informed consent procedures.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShoham, Vardaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814457en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37745037en_US
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