Seismic wave propagation stitching: Matching local and global techniques

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282549
Title:
Seismic wave propagation stitching: Matching local and global techniques
Author:
Brazier, Richard Anthony, 1967-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Multiple methods exist for modeling with synthetic seismograms, each with its own characteristic application; local and detailed; global and asymptotic; body and/or surface waves. Events such as the nuclear tests in the Tarim Basin in China, recorded at regional distances require more than one such characteristic. A successful model would need detail close in and a global result. The ability to join two methods can therefore be very powerful. Within this text the exploration is of finite difference and discrete wavenumber integration methods. The basis of the conversion between methods is the idea in Huygen's principle of representing a wave front as multiple sources, then propagated as an alternate method. Modeling detail locally, finite difference eventually becomes computationally intensive or undetailed. Representation theory replaces finite difference with discrete wavenumber integration propagating to the receiver at a regional distance. The requirement for multiple sources means that efficiency and optimization of methods are paramount.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geophysics.; Mathematics.; Computer Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Applied Mathematics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wallace, T. C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSeismic wave propagation stitching: Matching local and global techniquesen_US
dc.creatorBrazier, Richard Anthony, 1967-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrazier, Richard Anthony, 1967-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMultiple methods exist for modeling with synthetic seismograms, each with its own characteristic application; local and detailed; global and asymptotic; body and/or surface waves. Events such as the nuclear tests in the Tarim Basin in China, recorded at regional distances require more than one such characteristic. A successful model would need detail close in and a global result. The ability to join two methods can therefore be very powerful. Within this text the exploration is of finite difference and discrete wavenumber integration methods. The basis of the conversion between methods is the idea in Huygen's principle of representing a wave front as multiple sources, then propagated as an alternate method. Modeling detail locally, finite difference eventually becomes computationally intensive or undetailed. Representation theory replaces finite difference with discrete wavenumber integration propagating to the receiver at a regional distance. The requirement for multiple sources means that efficiency and optimization of methods are paramount.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeophysics.en_US
dc.subjectMathematics.en_US
dc.subjectComputer Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Mathematicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWallace, T. C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814451en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37744914en_US
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