Productivity of information technology in the face of regulation and organizational choices: Evidence from the healthcare industry

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282546
Title:
Productivity of information technology in the face of regulation and organizational choices: Evidence from the healthcare industry
Author:
Menon, Nirup, 1967-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The dissertation is on the impact of information technology (IT) on the economy. Theoretical and empirical analyses are reported in order to explain the productivity "paradox" surrounding IT. The techniques used in the study cover a wide range from simple deterministic production functions to panel data techniques and data envelopment analysis. The empirical study is set in the health care industry. A hospital, which is the the unit of analysis, is an organizational entity that provides an appropriate context for the study of the interactions between information technology, technological advancements, organizational factors and regulation. Overall, it was found that IT contributes in a positive manner to the production of healthcare services. However, measurement problems including "quality" of IT capital due to technological developments can lead to the underestimation of IT productivity. It is also seen that regulation plays a major role in the manner in which costs are allocated to input factors. In particular, the effect of the Prospective Payment System (PPS) legislated in 1983 is investigated. One of the findings of the cost function analysis is that, since PPS, hospitals have been moving toward cost containment. Non-parametric analyses is used to determine the allocative inefficiency in IT with respect to other inputs. The different techniques serve as means to triangulate the measure of IT impact on productivity and efficiency, and in addition, develop the theory underlying production techniques.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Management.; Information Science.; Health Sciences, Health Care Management.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Industrial Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lee, Byungtae

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleProductivity of information technology in the face of regulation and organizational choices: Evidence from the healthcare industryen_US
dc.creatorMenon, Nirup, 1967-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMenon, Nirup, 1967-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe dissertation is on the impact of information technology (IT) on the economy. Theoretical and empirical analyses are reported in order to explain the productivity "paradox" surrounding IT. The techniques used in the study cover a wide range from simple deterministic production functions to panel data techniques and data envelopment analysis. The empirical study is set in the health care industry. A hospital, which is the the unit of analysis, is an organizational entity that provides an appropriate context for the study of the interactions between information technology, technological advancements, organizational factors and regulation. Overall, it was found that IT contributes in a positive manner to the production of healthcare services. However, measurement problems including "quality" of IT capital due to technological developments can lead to the underestimation of IT productivity. It is also seen that regulation plays a major role in the manner in which costs are allocated to input factors. In particular, the effect of the Prospective Payment System (PPS) legislated in 1983 is investigated. One of the findings of the cost function analysis is that, since PPS, hospitals have been moving toward cost containment. Non-parametric analyses is used to determine the allocative inefficiency in IT with respect to other inputs. The different techniques serve as means to triangulate the measure of IT impact on productivity and efficiency, and in addition, develop the theory underlying production techniques.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectInformation Science.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Health Care Management.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLee, Byungtaeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814447en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37744793en_US
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